imprisonment

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imprisonment

[impriz′ənment]
Etymology: Fr, emprisonner, to confine
(in law) the act of confining, detaining, or arresting a person or in any way restraining personal liberty and preventing free exercise of movement. See also false imprisonment.

Patient discussion about imprisonment

Q. My friend is imprisoned for a planned murder. My friend is imprisoned for a planned murder. Family and friend assumes that he is bipolar, but as yet he is not been diagnosed. He has answered yes to all the questions in a questionnaire to indicate bipolar. Bipolar do commit murder often and would he have been manic when he did it?

A. It is not uncommon for someone suffering with bipolar to commit crimes, mostly this happens in a manic state. His family can talk to his lawyer about getting him a pychological evaluation, if he is dagnosed bipolar they can begin to treat him. He will still be responsible for his actions but they can work with him to make him better. Good luck

More discussions about imprisonment
References in classic literature ?
One day I was listening to some conversation upon this subject when an American student said that for some time he had been under sentence for a slight breach of the peace and had promised the constable that he would presently find an unoccupied day and betake himself to prison.
The cell was not a roomy one; still it was a little larger than an ordinary prison cell.
Why, this is your prison," replied Tollydiggle, "and in me behold your jailor.
DEAR SIR--Please advertise a series of twelve Racy Prints, from my fertile pencil, entitled, 'Scenes of Modern Prison Life,' by Thersites Junior.
So that night, when the moon was shining through the palm-trees and all the King's men were asleep, the parrot slipped out through the bars of the prison and flew across to the palace.
This troop, the only defence of the prison, overawed by its firm attitude not only the disorderly riotous mass of the populace, but also the detachment of the burgher guard, which, being placed opposite the Buytenhof to support the soldiers in keeping order, gave to the rioters the example of seditious cries, shouting, --
Twenty years ago, that pavement was worn with the footsteps of a mother and child, who, day by day, so surely as the morning came, presented themselves at the prison gate; often after a night of restless misery and anxious thoughts, were they there, a full hour too soon, and then the young mother turning meekly away, would lead the child to the old bridge, and raising him in her arms to show him the glistening water, tinted with the light of the morning's sun, and stirring with all the bustling preparations for business and pleasure that the river presented at that early hour, endeavour to interest his thoughts in the objects before him.
With the idea of exploring my prison, I started to look around.
While some brought all their energies to bear upon this toilsome task; and some, rearing ladders against the prison, tried to clamber to the summit of the walls they were too short to scale; and some again engaged a body of police a hundred strong, and beat them back and trod them under foot by force of numbers; others besieged the house on which the jailer had appeared, and driving in the door, brought out his furniture, and piled it up against the prison-gate, to make a bonfire which should burn it down.
In this prison that I am going to so unjustly, shall I have some free communication with the world outside?
A little further on, I found the older and smaller wall, which used to enclose the pent-up inner prison where nobody was put, except for ceremony.
It is a prison," said he, "but a traveling prison; and, with the right of putting my nose to the window, I could well stand a lease of a hundred years.