print

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print

identifying mark left by part of an animal's anatomy. The print left by the nasolabial plane is sometimes used as an identification.
References in periodicals archive ?
The documents include confidential witness statements, memos, a police bail notice, a charge document, a custody record and print-outs of police e-mails.
The torque applied to the rotor and the normal force on the bottom plate (h) of the chamber are recorded by electrical sensors (i) and (j) and the signals converted by the software to give the print-outs of E and V with time.
The computer print-outs provide early warning of system problems, pinpoint their locations and indicate their probable causes.
All final print-outs have to adhere to the approved test print-out.
WORRYING print-outs shown to the Birmingham Mail reveal that on some days more than a third of West Midland fire engines are allegedly unavailable due to a brigade shake up.
After a computerized fuel monitor is installed, it is essential for building staff as well as the manufacturer of the heating device to analyze the print-outs and regular reports.
Locala said it was no longer using print-outs for health visitors and staff were now ordered to immediately shred anything with identifiable information on following a meeting or appointment.
Meikle, 54, posted the print-outs in June last year but when the case came to trial at Paisley Sheriff Court, Terry Gallanagh, defending, said she did not have a case to answer because she had not broken the law.
Their accounts can be integrated with the MYOB Kounta system to publish end-of-day journals, accounts receivables and print-outs directly.
We also found some print-outs offering guidelines about ways of making a customer easily believe their claims," a police officer said.
According to the report, prosecutors said print-outs or downloads of documents he leaked were found in terrorist safe-houses and hideouts, including that of slain al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden.
One can readily foresee a congressman sitting at a console in his office poring over computer print-outs into the late evening hours or over the weekend and cutting through the paper arguments and justifications of executive programs with penetrating lines of questions.