principle


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principle

 [prin´sĭ-p'l]
1. a chemical component.
2. a substance on which certain of the properties of a drug depend.
3. an accepted or professed rule of action or conduct; in a given philosophical system it is a fundamental or general law or truth from which others are derived. In bioethics some important principles are beneficence, justice, nonmaleficence, and respect for autonomy; these are derived in part from professional roles and traditions.
active principle any constituent of a drug that helps to confer upon it a medicinal property.
Bobath p's a type of neurophysiological rehabilitation; see bobath method.
Bohr's principle of complementarity reflexes do not independently account for the complex nature of infant behavior.
negentropic principle a principle of general systems theory stating that open systems have mechanisms that slow down or arrest the process of movement toward less efficiency and growth. Negentropy (negative entropy) is the tendency toward order and organization.
pleasure principle (pleasure-pain principle) in psychoanalytic theory, an inborn tendency to avoid pain and seek pleasure through the immediate reduction of tension by either direct or fantasied gratification.
reality principle in psychoanalytic theory, the ego functions that modify the demands of the pleasure principle to meet the demands and requirements of the external world.

prin·ci·ple

(prin'si-pĕl), Do not confuse this word with principal.
1. A general or fundamental doctrine or tenet.
See also: law, rule, theorem.
2. The essential ingredient in a substance, especially one that gives it its distinctive quality or effect.
[L. principium, a beginning, fr. princeps, chief]

principle

/prin·ci·ple/ (prin´sip'l)
1. a chemical component.
2. a substance on which certain of the properties of a drug depend.
3. a law of conduct.

principle of infinitesimal dose  a fundamental principle of homeopathy: the more a remedy is diluted (even to the point that none of the medicinal substance is likely to be present), the more powerful and longer lasting will be its effect.
yin/yang principle  in Chinese philosophy, the concept of polar complements existing in dynamic equilibrium and always present simultaneously. In traditional Chinese medicine, a disturbance of the proper balance of yin and yang causes disease, and the goal is to maintain or to restore this balance.

principle

[prin′sipəl]
Etymology: L, principium, foundation
1 a general truth or established rule of action.
2 a prime source or element from which anything proceeds.
3 a law on which others are founded or from which others are derived.

principle

Vox populi A guiding rule or maxim. See Bateman's principle, Bolam principle, Ceiling principle, Dale's principle, Eggshell skull principle, Fortner principle, Handicap principle, Heuristic principle, Homeopathic principle, KISS principle, Mendelian principle, Pleasure principle, Polluter pays principle, PRICE principle, Reality principle.

prin·ci·ple

(prin'si-pĕl)
1. A general or fundamental doctrine or tenet.
See also: law, rule, theorem
2. The essential ingredient in a substance, especially one that gives it its distinctive quality or effect.
[L. principium, a beginning, fr. princeps, chief]

prin·ci·ple

(prin'si-pĕl)
1. A general or fundamental doctrine or tenet.
2. Essential ingredient in a substance.
[L. principium, a beginning, fr. princeps, chief]

principle

1. a chemical component.
2. a substance on which certain of the properties of a drug depend.
3. a law of conduct.

active principle
any constituent of a drug that helps to confer upon it a medicinal property.
reasonable person principle
the basis for many decisions in cases alleging negligence. The court bases its judgment on what it considers a reasonable person, a reasonable veterinarian in our context, would have done in the circumstances. This is the evidence that most expert witnesses are asked to give, evidence about what should be expected of a member of their profession in terms of quality of performance. Called also principle of the reasonable person.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chapter 1, "What Principles Are and Why You Need Them," discusses the nature of principles, surveys various kinds of principles, draws crucial definitions of "principle" from the survey, and shows the vital role of principles in thinking.
The first five chapters of the book rehearse and expand upon Cohen's powerful and elegant critique of Rawls's difference principle, the crux of which is that Rawls's restricted (or "lax") application of the difference principle to the basic structure of society (and not the personal choices of citizens made within that structure) turns out to be morally incoherent.
Each principle has its own section with the following information: (1) The guiding principle statement: A brief, straightforward statement of the principle; (2) A principle overview: The what, why and how of implementation relevant to the principle; (3) An "In Practice" example: A promising practice in Illinois pertaining to the principle; (4) An "In Perkins IV" statement: Legislative language that is aligned with the principle; (5) "Design Elements at a Glance": Design elements associated with the principle; (6) Tools and Resources: Selected tools and resources for implementing the principle; and (7) Appendices: A copy of one selected tool or resource, reprinted with permission of the publisher or author.
Kitchener's (1984) introduction of principle ethics on counseling and psychology ethics notes the ultimate practicality of principle ethics, The authors maintain that although a strong influence of principle ethics in the area of counselor education emerges through the review, there is little clear evidence of influence in the areas of counseling research or practice.
The 12 principles the O'Connor family chooses to live by are: the acceptance principle, the God principle, the structure principle, the home principle, the community principle, the responsibility principle, the Earth principle, the reading principle, the art principle, the forgiveness principle, the "yes" principle, and the humor principle.
Under Principle I, internally displaced people are entitled to the full rights that all other persons in the country enjoy.
He also mentions solidarity, a permanent principle and a moral virtue, which commits us to the common good.
In most ethical dilemmas one ethical principle trumps all other ethical principles.
This camp had a focus on environmental stewardship and used meal time as a powerful way to teach this principle to families.
hunger, violence, genocide, sickness and homelessness) on the one hand and ascribes to the principle of working together for a common future on the other hand, the 21st Century African lecturer needs to be equipped with the resources that can enable him or her to develop the African learner with (1) critical and independent thinking skills and (2) the ability to apply content knowledge while working in collaboration for the solution of complex problems.
Bernard Lewis's book (2002) about the encounters between the Islamic world and the West make it clear that there was enough hostility and suspicion on both sides to make the relationship difficult from the start, but it is tempting to conclude that "What went wrong" in the Islamic world was the failure to embrace the non-discriminatory principle that Westerners value so highly.
Principle 1: Suffering and death from lack of food, shelter, and medical care are bad.