primordial

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primordial

 [pri-mor´de-al]
original or primitive; of the simplest and most undeveloped character.

pri·mor·di·al

(prī-mōr'dē-ăl),
1. Relating to a primordium.
2. Relating to a structure in its first or earliest stage of development. Synonym(s): primal (2)

primordial

/pri·mor·di·al/ (pri-mor´de-al) primitive.

primordial

(prī-môr′dē-əl)
adj.
1. Being or happening first in sequence of time; original.
2. Primary or fundamental: play a primordial role.
3. Biology Belonging to or characteristic of the earliest stage of development of an organism or a part: primordial cells.
n.
A basic principle.

pri·mor′di·al·ly adv.

primordial

[prīmôr′dē·əl]
Etymology: L, primordium, origin
1 characteristic of the most undeveloped or earliest state, specifically those cells or tissues that are formed in the early stages of embryonic development.
2 first or original; primitive.

pri·mor·di·al

(prī-mōr'dē-ăl)
1. Relating to a primordium.
2. Relating to a structure in its first or earliest stage of development.
Synonym(s): primal (2) , primitive.

primordial

original; existing from the beginning.

pri·mor·di·al

(prī-mōr'dē-ăl)
1. Relating to a primordium.
2. Relating to a structure in its first or earliest stage of development.

primordial

original or primitive; of the simplest and most undeveloped character.

primordial germ cell
cells which provide the origins of the spermatozoa and the ovum; they originate from the yolk sac endoderm and migrate to the developing gonad.
References in periodicals archive ?
what distinguishes the other from the self is the primordiality of the
The creators of fiction, "officers of the third world culture" in Rieff's words, must instead persuade people of the commanding primordiality of their creations.
In the face of what Nietzsche no doubt suspected would have been the ridicule of academic officialdom, he was willing to argue that the significance of sexuality can exist outside of the zone of the family and social responsibility: it can exist in its own right, as a form of pure pleasure, pure ecstasy, and thus, as a revelatory epistemic connection to the primordiality of life, to the Ur-Eine qua Urlust.
Moreover, this way of formulating the problem, inasmuch as it assumes the primordiality of theoretical consciousness, provides little room for a recognition of the role of pragmatic activity in shaping the way human beings apprehend and speak of reality.
Thus, one must conclude that Marcel does not ever lose phenomenological primordiality.
Such audacity becomes, paradoxically, a humble confession of language's limitations before the primordiality of an American reality.
This general theme of the primordiality or basicness of the circumspective relation to things as ready-to-hand is central in Heidegger, particularly to his famous attack upon the problem of skepticism in the Cartesian tradition of epistemology.
the principle of value primordiality, according to which it is ensured the creation of material and moral conditions, it is supported and promoted the application of specific evaluation and selection criteria, the affirmation of creativity and talent;
The primordiality of sense perception which discloses entities as necessarily true by virtue of how they appear to us is distinguished from speech which always takes the entities that appear by asserting or speaking about them and thereby risking the possibility of falsity.
Recognition of this fact highlights what the New Melanesian Ethnography has so far obscured: practices that reassert primordiality in this way indicate that some Melanesians conceptualize something antecedent to, prerequisite for, and ultimately beyond the plenitude of all possible relations.
Voegelin's own application of the phenomenological method is confined to its experiential applications rather than to its ontological primordiality.