primordia


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pri·mor·di·a

(prī-mōr'dē-ă),
Plural of primordium.

primordia

pri·mor·di·a

()
Plural of primordium.

primordium

(pri-mord'e-um) plural.primordia [L. primordium, origin] Anlage.
References in periodicals archive ?
Once cleaned, a moist paper towel was wrapped in a loose spiral around each individual cutting, ensuring that roots and root primordia (but not shoot apices) were placed in contact with the towel (Fig.
Long-term engraftment following transplantation of pig pancreatic primordia into non-immunosuppressed diabetic rhesus macaques.
But what biological mechanism could push the new primordia away from the older ones, in the same way that magnetization made the droplets repel one another?
TABLE 1 Comparison of mean measurements of thyroid primordia from stage 13, 14, and 15 chick embryos.
They quickly discovered that only 2 "short" days - when nights were as long as 10-1/2 hours - made Biloxi soybeans produce primordia 5 days later.
In some individuals, an accessory pancreatic duct (of Santorini) is present, a vestige of the pancreas origin (torn two embryonic endodermal primordia that evaginate from the foregut.
All equiseta have pre-formed bud and root primordia at each node of both the aerial stems and underground rhizomes (Gifford & Foster, 1989).
In contrast, the tales of Day Seven, proposed by Dioneo and recounted preciseley in the valley, point to the drama of loss and consequent emptiness which took place in Eden at humankind's primordia through their focus on deceptions played by wives on their husbands, that is, parodying what was intended to be the most sacred bond uniting man and woman.
Also, it is affected by environmental conditions during the initiation of tiller primordia and subsequent development stages (ALMEIDA; MUNDSTOCK, 2001).