primitive reflex

primitive reflex

any of various simple, stereotypic, automatic neuromuscular responses characteristic of the mature fetus and newborn but typically inhibited during the first year of life; primitive reflexes are directed by brainstem centers and include the startle (Moro), rooting, and tonic neck reflexes; abnormal persistence can lead to clumsiness, incoordination, and perceptual difficulties.

primitive reflex

any reflex normal in an infant or fetus. Its presence in an adult usually indicates serious neurological disease, such as dementia. Some kinds of primitive reflexes are grasp reflex, Moro reflex, and sucking reflex.

prim·i·tive re·flex

(prim-i'tiv rē'fleks)
Any of a group of reflexes seen during gestation and infancy that typically become integrated by an early age (most by 6 months); also seen in adults who have sustained an injury or acquired a disease of the central nervous system.
References in periodicals archive ?
They explain this phenomenon to be due to a loss of cortical control which in turn causes expression of a primitive reflex, i.
The tonic neck reflex or fencing pose, another primitive reflex, is noted when the baby's head is rotated to one side and the arm and leg on the same side as the face extend out while those on the opposite side are flexed.