vaccinia

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vaccinia

 [vak-sin´e-ah]
the cutaneous and sometimes systemic reactions associated with vaccination with smallpox vaccine. See also cowpox and paravaccinia.
vaccinia gangreno´sa generalized vaccinia with failure to develop antibodies against the virus (due to agammaglobulinemia), with spreading necrosis at the site and metastasis of lesions throughout the body.
generalized vaccinia a condition of widespread vaccinial lesions resulting from sensitivity response to smallpox vaccination and delayed production of neutralizing antibodies.
progressive vaccinia vaccinia gangrenosa.

vac·cin·i·a

(vak-sin'ē-ă),
An infection, primarily local and limited to the site of inoculation, induced in humans by inoculation with the vaccinia virus, type species in the genus Orthopoxvirus (family Poxviridae) to confer resistance to smallpox. On about the third day after this vaccination, papules form at the site of inoculation, which are transformed into umbilicated vesicles and later pustules; they then dry up, and the scab falls off on about the 21st day, leaving a pitted scar; in some cases there are more or less marked constitutional disturbances. Because of the global elimination of smallpox, routine vaccination is not now practiced.
[L. vaccinus, relating to a cow, fr. vacca, a cow]

vaccinia

(văk-sĭn′ē-ə)
n.
1. See cowpox.
2. The usually mild, cutaneous and sometimes systemic reaction in individuals who have been inoculated with smallpox vaccine.

vac·cin′i·al adj.

vaccinia

[vaksin′ē·ə]
Etymology: L, vaccinus
an infectious disease of cattle caused by a poxvirus that may be transmitted to humans by direct contact or deliberate inoculation as a vaccine against smallpox. A pustule develops at the site of infection, usually followed by malaise and fever that last for several days. After 2 weeks the pustule becomes a crust that eventually drops off, leaving a scar. Satellite lesions may occur, and the virus may be spread to other sites by scratching. Individuals with eczema or other preexisting skin disease may develop generalized vaccinia. Rarely, a severe encephalitis follows vaccinia. Also called cowpox. Compare smallpox. See also vaccination.
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Vaccinia

vac·cin·i·a

(vak-sin'ē-ă)
An infection, primarily local and limited to the site of inoculation, induced in humans by inoculation with the vaccinia virus, type species in the genus Orthopoxvirus to confer resistance to smallpox. Because of the global elimination of smallpox, routine vaccination is not now practiced.
[L. vaccinus, relating to a cow, fr. vacca, a cow]

vaccinia

A mild disease, acquired from the udders of cows, that causes blisters on the hands but no significant general upset. The disease is of historic importance. From knowledge of it, Edward Jenner developed vaccination against SMALLPOX. Also known as cowpox.

vaccinia

the vaccinia virus; a laboratory generated virus, antigenically related to the cowpox virus, that causes a lesion on the teat skin of affected cows. It is indistinguishable from cowpox lesions and used to be used to vaccinate humans against smallpox.
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We used sample X (Table 1) for the isolation of the primary reaction product marked X dimeric rq, lane 3.
All 17 DNA samples produced amplicons of the expected sizes in primary reaction and nested reactions of the assay.
Figure 1 is an illustration of the minimum energy surface associated with the two primary reaction coordinates of the system: d(O2-H2) represents the proton transfer and d(C2-H21) represents the hydride transfer.
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