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prick

(prĭk)
n.
1.
a. The act of piercing or pricking.
b. The sensation of being pierced or pricked.
2.
a. A persistent or sharply painful feeling of sorrow or remorse.
b. A small, sharp, local pain, such as that made by a needle or bee sting.
3. A small mark or puncture made by a pointed object.
v. pricked, pricking, pricks
v.tr.
1.
a. To puncture lightly.
b. To make (a hole) by puncturing something.
2. To spur (a horse).
3. To pierce the quick of (a horse's hoof) while shoeing.
v.intr.
1. To pierce or puncture something or cause a pricking feeling.
2. To feel a pang or twinge from being pricked.

prick

noun (slang)
(1) Penis.
(2) A person who acts in an inappropriate and/or rude manner; jerk.

verb To sustain an injury with a sharp object, in particular a needle.

prick

(prik)
To penetrate or puncture the skin with a sharp object, e.g., with a needle during phlebotomy or a test for allergen hypersensitivity.
References in periodicals archive ?
2 : a wound or burning pain caused by the pricking of the skin with a stinger <the sting of a bitter wind>
Spire's terahertz quantum cascade laser instrument eliminates the need to draw blood samples by finger pricking.
A TOILET attendant faces a three-month wait to learn if he has HIV/Aids after pricking himself on a dirty needle.
A DOCTOR won pounds 465,000 damages after pricking her finger on a needle left on a hospital trolley.
Because people with diabetes cannot properly metabolize glucose, today they typically monitor their glucose levels by frequently pricking their fingertips to draw the drop of blood necessary for conventional glucose monitoring.
She hoped that their efforts to create awareness regarding problems like pricking of IV bottles, needle stick injuries etc.
To make the most of your growing seedlings, you will need to begin pricking out the seeds sown last month, to avoid overcrowding.
They check their levels by pricking a finger and placing a drop of blood on a reactive strip.
Pricking of IV preparations is very risky which could be controlled by regular refresher courses especially for paramedics and nursing staff.
The current process of pricking a finger for testing glucose levels in the blood may discourage patient compliance and provides only intermittent measurements.
In Pakistan pricking of IV bottles is one of the major causative factors for the spread of Hepatitis and other viral diseases which has now become an epidemic.
Pricking of IV infusion Bottles has become habit which will take time to give it up.