priapus


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pe·nis

, pl.

pe·nes

,

pe·ni·ses

(pē'nis, pē'nēz, pē'nis-ez), [TA]
The organ of copulation and urination in the male; formed of three columns of erectile tissue, two arranged laterally on the dorsum (corpora cavernosa penis) and one median ventrally (corpus spongiosum penis); the urethra traverses the latter; the extremity (glans penis) is formed by an expansion of the corpus spongiosum and is more or less completely covered by a free fold of skin (prepuce).
[L. tail]

priapus

See penis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Unlike drugs prescribed for erectile dysfunction, which require ongoing treatment and come with potential risks and side effects, the Priapus Shot[R] starts the transformation after the first injection and delivers lasting results," says Dr.
apart with their teeth, witnessed by the terrified statue of Priapus.
Eye Way: Lascaux Priapus, Tutankhamen crab, Crete amphora, Nazca
The 'garden' deity to whom Margot calls out is naturally Priapus whose evocation here points to Pangloss's 'garden' lesson, where Cunegonde rather than Paquette ogles the philosopher's "raison sufisante.
What Caro describes is actually a hybrid, a femininely dressed marble figurine of Priapus with breasts.
A discourse on the worship of Priapus, by member Richard Knight, combines both sides of the society.
1) The Satyricon, a prose parody of the Odyssey written by Petronius, describes the events of Encolpius, a Greek pursued and tortured by the god Priapus in lieu of Odysseus's tor-menter, Poseidon.
In the early 1970's, Williams was one of the first poets of his generation to come out in print, contributing to the Priapus in 1970 and The Male Muse in 1973.
Then came Priapus Saying, "Unfortunate Daphnis--but why are you wasting away?
Another find is a stone image of the fertility god Priapus who was much favoured by farmers and gardeners.
The key images Waddington studies in his richly illustrated book are the Priapus, the Erasmian author portrait, the author-as-prophet portrait, and many variations of the satyr or the silenus (a philosophical satyr), including the phallic-satyr head.