prescribing error


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prescribing error

An error in the choice or administration of drugs for patients. Included are incorrect dose or medicine, duplicate therapy, incorrect route of administration, or wrong patient. In one extensive study of prescriptions written by physicians in a tertiary-care teaching hospital, 0.3% were erroneous, and more than half of these were rated as having the potential for adverse consequences. Monitoring of medications and patients is thought to be helpful in limiting these errors.
See also: error
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By this determination of these MEs, the prescribing error means an error occurred by selection of incorrect drug for the patient (based on indications, contraindications, known allergy, existing drug therapy, and other factors), route, dose, dosage form, quantity, concentration, rate of administration, authorized physician (or other legitimate prescriber), or instruction for use of a drug ordered.
In the evaluation of the origin of medication errors, administration of medicines by nurses caused just over half (51%) of all detected errors, with prescribing errors by doctors causing 47% of the medication errors.
Prescribing errors are most common during internship due to various attributes focusing on lack of experience and shifting of priorities [2] resulting in harm to patients [3].
Prescribing errors are harmful to the patients and in worst cases they may lead to fatality.
The written medication order is the first place in which a prescribing error may occur.
2010), for example, CPOE was found to be very effective in reducing prescribing error in a particular case, namely, the simultaneous ordering of warfarin (an anticoagulant) and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (an antibiotic that enhances the effect of warfarin and can induce adverse bleeding).
Prescribing errors in psychiatry department: An audit from a hospital in Lahore, Journal of Pakistan Psychiatric Society.
Overall, prescribing errors were more than halved and incomplete and unclear drug orders were completely eliminated the study found.
Methylphenidate errors were more likely to involve prescribing errors compared with dextroamphetamine/amphetamine (Adderall) (36% vs.
While pharmacists usually catch this sort of prescribing error that may not always happen, especially if you get your prescriptions filled in different places.
Over a period of two months at a British hospital, the investigators identified each incidence of a prescribing error, measured the mistake, and determined the possible cause.
Handouts do not include the drug classification, so patients receiving the amoxicillin-clavulanate (Augmentin) handout would not be informed that they were receiving a penicillin; such information would provide a double-check to help reduce prescribing error.