presbycusis


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presbycusis

 [pres″be-ku´sis]
progressive, bilaterally symmetrical perceptive hearing loss occurring with age; it usually occurs after age 50 and is caused by structural changes in the organs of hearing. Initially, changes in the inner ear, such as degeneration of hair cells and changes in the basilar membrane, lead to decreased hearing at higher tones and a decline in pitch discrimination. As hearing continues to be lost, even lower pitch tones become harder to hear.

pres·by·a·cu·sis

, presbyacusia (prez'bē-ă-kū'sis, -kū'sē-ă),
Loss of hearing associated with aging; manifest as reduced ability to perceive or discriminate sounds; the pattern and age of onset vary. See: phonemic regression.
[presby- + G. akousis, hearing]

presbycusis

/pres·by·cu·sis/ (-ku´sis) progressive, bilaterally symmetrical sensorineural hearing loss occurring with age.

presbycusis

[-ko̅o̅′sis]
Etymology: Gk, presbys + akousis, hearing
hearing loss associated with aging. It usually involves both a loss of hearing sensitivity and a reduction in the clarity of speech.

presbycusis

Age-related hearing loss Audiology A progressive loss of hearing 2º to age-related changes in the inner or middle ear, beginning with high-frequency sounds–eg, speech, which may have a genetic predisposition, as it tends to occur in families; it occurs ±25% > age 65 to 75 yrs old, 50%  > age 75. See Hearing loss.

pres·by·cu·sis

(prez'bē-kyū'sis)
A usually gradual, frequently bilateral sensorineural or conductive hearing loss often related to the middle ear that gradually occurs in most people as they age; usually more pronounced for high-pitched sounds; the pattern and age of onset may vary.
Synonym(s): presbyacusis, presbyacusia.
[G. presbys, old man, + akousis, hearing]

pres·by·cu·sis

(prez'bē-kyū'sis)
A usually gradual, frequently bilateral sensorineural or conductive hearing loss often related to the middle ear that gradually occurs in most people as they age; usually more pronounced for high-pitched sounds.
[G. presbys, old man, + akousis, hearing]

presbycusis (prez´bikū´sis),

n the gradual loss of hearing that occurs naturally with age. The first sign is the diminished capacity to discern high-pitched tones.

presbycusis, presbyacusia

progressive, bilateral loss of hearing with advancing age; occurs in several animal species, especially old dogs.
References in periodicals archive ?
Presbycusis and noise-induced hearing loss are among the most common causes of SNHL, however imaging is neither indicated nor helpful as these demonstrate characteristic patient histories, audiograms, and no positive radiologic findings.
Noise trauma is one of the major reasons triggering Presbycusis among people.
5-3 kHz) after subtracting a presbycusis correction for subjects aged over 60 years as follows: [(age in years - 60) x 0.
Temporal bone analysis of patients with presbycusis reveals high frequency of mitochondrial mutations.
Furthermore, we were able to demonstrate that dietary moderation and specific nutrients reduce the progression of age-related hearing loss, and we concluded that it is likely that a combination therapy would provide a synergistic protective effect on presbycusis and possibly on aging as well.
Common causes of hearing loss Conductive Sensorineural CI Presbycusis OM Autoimmune disease SOM Sudden sensorineural hearing loss Otosclerosis Labyrinthitis Cholesteatoma Meniere disease Trauma--ossicular discontinuity Acoustic schwannoma Trauma--labyrinth injury CI, cerumen impaction; OM, otitis media; SOM, serous otitis media.
The principle behind it is a biological reality that hearing experts refer to as presbycusis, or aging ear.
Age-related hearing loss, or presbycusis, begins after the age of 20 and first affects the highest frequencies ( 18 to 20 kHz.
Presbycusis is a human hearing disorder that progresses with age.
This condition is known as presbycusis (prez-buh-KYOO-sis).
Presbycusis refers to a wide range of problems associated with auditory deterioration (Hull, 1977; Stein & Bienenfeld; Williams).