prerenal


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prerenal

 [pre-re´nal]
1. located in front of a kidney.
2. pertaining to a process that occurs before the kidney is reached, such as acute renal failure in which the kidney does not receive adequate blood flow. See also postrenal.

pre·re·nal

(prē-rē'năl),
Anterior to a kidney.
[L. ren, kidney]

prerenal

/pre·re·nal/ (pre-re´nal)
1. located in front of a kidney.
2. occurring before the kidney is reached.

prerenal

[-rē′nəl]
Etymology: L, prae, before, ren, kidney
1 pertaining to the area in front of the kidney.
2 pertaining to events occurring before reaching the kidney.

prerenal

in front of the kidney, used usually in a physiological sense rather than an anatomical one. The most important prerenal mechanism is severe reduction in renal blood flow and therefore glomerular filtration in shock, dehydration and severe hemorrhage.

prerenal failure
failure of the urinary mechanism due to inadequate perfusion of the kidney.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, renal dysfunction could be prerenal (requiring aggressive fluid administration) or renal (requiring more cautious fluid administration) in origin.
Urine analysis suggesting prerenal azotaemia was seen in 26% and suggesting intrinsic renal azotaemia in 62%.
Prerenal AKI may be due to either hypovolemia associated with vomiting and diarrhea associated with chemotherapy (often combined with inadequate fluid intake) [1].
As BUN/Cr ratio is used to analyze whether prerenal azotemia or tubular ischemia exists in AKI, molecular hydrogen therapy may not be as effective as we thought [13].
A widely accepted scheme [4] divides the IVC development into three different parts: prerenal, renal, and infrarenal segments.
Acute gastroenteritis with viral infection is the most common cause of severe diarrhea in infants and young children, often eliciting severe dehydration and prerenal failure [1, 2].
Similar findings were observed in present subject suggesting prerenal azotemia secondary to heart failure and low cardiac output.
Renal failure in cirrhosis: prerenal azotemia, hepatorenal syndrome and acute tubular necrosis.
The most frequent anatomic anomalies are the complete or partial absence of IVC, the presence of bilateral IVC, and hypoplasia of renal and prerenal segments, followed by the hypoplasia of the postrenal segment (Garcia-Fuster et al 2006; Bass et al 2000).
Normal urea:creatinine ratio in a healthy population was considered as 20 mmol/L: mmol/L, while urea:creatinine ratio equal to 21 mmol/L: mmol/L was considered to be a sign of prerenal azotemia (PRA) [17].
In addition, patients with raised urea (> 50 mg%) and creatinine levels (< 3 mg/dl), which subsequently improved without any specific intervention, were defined as having prerenal azotemia.