prerenal


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Related to prerenal: intrarenal, prerenal azotemia, prerenal uremia, postrenal

prerenal

 [pre-re´nal]
1. located in front of a kidney.
2. pertaining to a process that occurs before the kidney is reached, such as acute renal failure in which the kidney does not receive adequate blood flow. See also postrenal.

pre·re·nal

(prē-rē'năl),
Anterior to a kidney.
[L. ren, kidney]

prerenal

/pre·re·nal/ (pre-re´nal)
1. located in front of a kidney.
2. occurring before the kidney is reached.

prerenal

[-rē′nəl]
Etymology: L, prae, before, ren, kidney
1 pertaining to the area in front of the kidney.
2 pertaining to events occurring before reaching the kidney.

prerenal

in front of the kidney, used usually in a physiological sense rather than an anatomical one. The most important prerenal mechanism is severe reduction in renal blood flow and therefore glomerular filtration in shock, dehydration and severe hemorrhage.

prerenal failure
failure of the urinary mechanism due to inadequate perfusion of the kidney.
References in periodicals archive ?
Renal manifestations of malaria can range from prerenal azotemia to acute renal failure, nephrotic syndrome and acute glomerulonephritis (20-22).
Hypercreatinemia and prerenal azotemia are known as predictors of adverse outcomes in some diseases.
Miyoglobinuri disindaki idrar bulgulari bobrek tutulumunun derecesi ile ilgilidir; once prerenal, daha sonra intrarenal bobrek yetersizligi ile uyumlu bulgular dikkat ceker.
These values include a significant drop in the hemoglobin level attributable to active bleeding, prerenal azotemia due to renal hypoperfusion during the early stages of decreased cardiac output (Russo et al.
They continue to teach the patients and their families treatment options and reinforce the teaching previously completed in the prerenal clinic.
19) Although diuretics are effective treatment, they may exacerbate prerenal azotemia.
In the majority of patients the renal failure is due to prerenal azotemia (reduced renal blood flow) and tubular necrosis.
Renal injury that appears after acute high-dose lead exposure may include reversible deficits in proximal tubular reabsorption and prerenal azotemia induced by renal vasoconstriction and/or volume depletion (Coyle et al.
Useful for distinguishing tubular from prerenal and glomerular injury.
Traditional NSAIDs possess dose-limiting toxicities, mainly, the risk for gastrointestinal ulceration and increased bleeding times, with other toxicities, such as prerenal azotemia, occurring at all dose ranges (Bjorkman, 1998; Cryer & Kimmey, 1998; Tolman).
Other causes of prerenal proteinuria include hypertension, stress, fever, strenuous exercise, and positional changes.