preoccupation

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preoccupation

[prē·ok′yəpā′shən]
a state of being self-absorbed or engrossed in one's own thoughts to a degree that hinders effective contact with or relationship to external reality.
References in periodicals archive ?
These preoccupations are related notably to brain drains, generic medicines and scientific research In health sector, he said, stressing the current threat of swine flu to which the continent and Algeria prepared well.
By attending to child murder as a motif across a span of time, one gains a general perspective on British cultural preoccupations of the 18th and 19th centuries.
But then, Young wishes also to disqualify any attempt to read the texts in terms of the specific political preoccupations of the period in which they are written.
Life is a stage; we play our part and receive our reward," wrote Vondel, the great poet of the Netherlands, expressing the moral preoccupation of 17th-century Dutch culture (1).
By beginning with a volume of "Selected Stories"--stories spanning the career of a writer--we were able to identify preoccupations of the writer throughout the body of his work, as well as ascertain tonal changes and other developments.
Such are the preoccupations of a Martha Stewart shopper.
While such competitive tendencies and sexual preoccupations may hold a great deal of significance for us when we are in our reproductive years, they may ultimately be a burden as we get older.
Being contemplative requires being wide awake and fresh in our perceptions of people and things; it is not being distracted and filled with preoccupations and prejudices.
In Van Nuys, there's no shortage of reminders that City Hall's principal preoccupations fall well outside the San Fernando Valley.
Quiet Stories, her second piece for OBT, is a lovely, contemplative work that capitalizes on the life experience of the dancers as well as on Moseley's own preoccupations of the moment.
The Pope made no secret of the fact that the promotion of Catholic social doctrine is "one of my liveliest preoccupations.
He simply writes about his personal preoccupations and confesses freely he can do no other.