prenatal stress


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prenatal stress

Anxiety, tension, depression, or other psychological discomfort experienced by a pregnant woman.
See also: stress
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2005, 2006) illustrate how prenatal stress can modify the response to lead exposure.
Otizmde prenatal stres faktorlerinin arastirildigi 188 otistik cocugu olan anne ile 202 normal gelisim gosteren bebegi olan annenin katildigi retrospektif bir calismada otistik cocuklarin annelerinin gebelik donemlerinde is kaybi, es olumu gibi stres faktorlerine yaklasik iki kat daha fazla maruz kaldigi ve gebeligin son aylarinda strese maruziyet oykusunun daha fazla oldugu saptanmistir (22).
Ultimately, 19 children of mothers exposed to low prenatal stress and 39 children of mothers exposed to moderate to high prenatal stress--a subset of the full sample--were evaluated for cognitive development at 2 years of age.
In female offspring, the impact of prenatal stress predominated in behavioral effects, with permanent elevations in FI response rates and decreased postreinforcement pause times (Figure 9).
Maternal prenatal stress and depression is linked to preterm birth and low infant birth weight, which increases the risk of cardiovascular disease.
Those findings are consistent with considerable evidence from animal studies demonstrating that experimentally induced prenatal stress has direct effects upon development of the fetal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, with resultant long-term behavioral disturbances in the offspring.
The new "Dianetics" advertising campaign, which will also tie in the video and audio releases, currently portrays a startlingly realistic "living" fetus under various conditions of prenatal stress.
If OGT's status as a biomarker for exposure to prenatal stress and heightened risk for neurodevelopmental problems is confirmed in humans, Bale said it could help detect vulnerable individuals earlier in life than is currently possible.
The research team identified the main prenatal stress factors as severe family problems, such as financial difficulty or alcohol/drug abuse, and maternal mental health.
Studies of early care-giving in rats have found that high levels of mothers' licking and grooming their pups soon after birth can increase the activity of these genes and may reverse the effects of prenatal stress on their offspring.
The study findings raise the exciting possibility that a higher maternal choline intake may counter some of the adverse effects of prenatal stress on behavioral, neuroendocrine, and metabolic development in the offspring," said Marie Caudill, PhD, Cornell University, who is an author of the study and a leading choline researcher.