prenatal screening


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pre·na·tal screen·ing

screening for the detection of fetal disease, usually by ultrasound examination or by testing amnionic fluid obtained by amniocentesis. Other screening techniques include testing maternal serum and placental biopsy.

prenatal screening

Testing of maternal serum, amniotic fluid, or chorionic villi to evaluate the developing fetus for congenital diseases such as Down syndrome or structural heart defects.
See also: screening
References in periodicals archive ?
The campaign will provide women and their healthcare providers with access to educational information about the types of prenatal screening and diagnostic tests, their strengths and limitations, test results interpretation, and actions to consider based on these results.
This data driven report contains over 40 links to online copies of actual prenatal screening deals and contract documents as submitted to the Securities Exchange Commission by companies and their partners, where available.
non-invasive prenatal screening technologies such as CS for single gene
Of the established forms of prenatal screening, the ultrasound is
Extent to Which Canadian Prenatal Record Forms Integrate Key Recommendations from Canadian Guidelines for the Diagnosis of FASD Provinces and Territories (revision date) AB BC (2007) (2007) Recommendations Prenatal Screening for Maternal Alcohol Use Pre-pregnancy use of ETOH x (
The group sees the current programs of prenatal screening for Down Syndrome as a misuse of science.
Defiant Birth gives voice to the experience of such women, who for a variety of reasons regard prenatal screening as an unnecessary and unwelcome spectre of negativity in their lives.
CDC's New Recommendations for HIV screening in pregnant women state:--HIV screening should be included in the routine panel of prenatal screening tests for all pregnant women.
Feminists have long argued that, depending on the perception of 'disability' and what constitutes a 'viable' foetus, the issue of which foetuses should be aborted due to results from prenatal screening tests raises interesting questions for biomedicine.
Prenatal screening and selective pregnancy termination can be highly cost-effective under some conditions, but these methods raise ethical, social, and cultural concerns that may preclude their use.
Low uptake of prenatal screening for Down's syndrome in minority ethnic groups and socially deprived groups: a reflection of women's attitudes or a failure to facilitate informed choices?