premonitory


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premonitory

[-mon′iter′ē]
Etymology: L, prae + monere, to warn
an early symptom or sign of a disease. The term is commonly used to describe minor symptoms that precede a major health problem.

premonitory

(prē-mŏn′ĭ-tō-rē) [LL. praemonitorius]
Giving a warning, as an early symptom.
References in periodicals archive ?
French Foreign Minister Alain Juppe, who attended the swearing-in ceremony in Barcelona, said the Arab Spring "shows just how premonitory this initiative is.
We found that headache prevention is possible when a triptan is administered during the premonitory period.
Two adult male crimson rosellas (Platycercus elegans) and an adult female eastern rosella (Platycercus eximius) were found dead in their cages in a private aviary in March 2009, April 2010, and February 2010, respectively, without premonitory signs.
The pervasiveness of Camping's premonitory, its daunting implications and the sincerity of its adherents did in fact give the world pause.
Bayley and Shearing argue that private security guards as agents of property owners are able to exert even greater power than the public police do; thus, they are able to "take premonitory action on the basis of social criteria that do not have to be justified in terms of law" (cf.
Kubisch I, Diessenbacher P, Schmidt E, Gollnick H, Leverkus M: Premonitory epidermolysis bullosa acquisita mimicking eyelid dermatitis: successful treatment with rituximab and protein A immunoapheresis.
As announced by Guy Debord's premonitory visions: 'The whole life of societies in which modern conditions of production reign, promises to be an immense accumulation of spectacles.
Cumulative damage to the skin caused by UVR is dependent on both the magnitude and duration of exposure, but chronic skin damage can occur without obvious or premonitory signs or even a documented history of significant or recurrent sunburn.
In this disturbing image we are given a brief premonitory glimpse of Gabriel's immediate future, in which he is horribly disfigured in an explosion at Ashburn.
There follows a premonitory river journey between the hinterland and the capital, which cannot help but remind us of Conrad's Heart of Darkness.
Like Barthes's description of the experience of looking at the photograph of a man condemned to die, Ita's experience of the journey through lands condemned to drown takes place in a state of premonitory nostalgia that is closely connected to her photographic work, which seeks to preserve at least the image of the places she visits (Camera Lucida 96).
It is possible that such seismic pattern can be used as a premonitory tool for the major volcanic crises.