premium

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Related to premiums: Insurance Premiums

pre·mi·um

(prē'mē-ŭm)
The amount that must be paid to the insurer to maintain the desired health insurance coverage.

premium

(prē′mē-um)
A payment made periodically to a health care insurer in exchange for benefits coverage (indemnity against future expenses).

pre·mi·um

(prē'mē-ŭm)
The amount that must be paid to the insurer to maintain the desired health insurance coverage.

premium,

n the amount charged by a dental benefits organization for coverage of a level of benefits for a specified time.
premium, earned,
n the portion of a policy's premium payment for which the protection of the policy has already been given.
premium rate,
n the price per unit of insurance.
premium tax,
n an assessment levied by a state government, usually on the net premium income collected in that state by insurance companies.
premium, unearned,
n the part of the premium applicable to the unexpired part of the policy period.
References in periodicals archive ?
If the insurance arrangement with a foreign captive is properly treated as insurance for Federal income tax purposes, the premiums paid with respect to such an insurance arrangement are subject to the FET.
Smith's Restaurant at Union Station in Washington, reports an increased demand for super premiums.
This, in turn, engenders a still greater incentive to leave the troubled fund or requires the payment of still higher premiums to support it.
During 1992, UGTIC reported GAAP net income of $491 thousand on earned premium of $10.
6 percent increase in premiums this past July, reflecting increases for medical costs and lost-time benefit level increases.
At the end of the level premium period, this policy provides for a return of level premiums to be paid to the owner of the policy.
Ordinarily, life insurance premiums paid to such a trust are deemed gifts, because the proceeds Hill ultimately benefit the trust beneficiaries after the insured dies.
The complaint about vanishing-premium products was that the buyer ended up paying more premiums than originally forecast.
The only way employers can meet the strain of higher premiums is to shift costs to employees.
Thus, insurance premiums inherently cost more than standby credit lines.
The property and casualty business segment now accounts for approximately 40 percent of total net premiums earned, up from 24 percent in the first nine months of 1993.
The cash value is guaranteed to grow and become equal to the premiums paid by the end of the initial level premium paying period (15, 20 or 30 years).