premise

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premise

[prem′is]
Etymology: L, prae + mittere, to send
a proposition that is presented as the basis of an argument and is usually established beforehand.

premise

(prem'is)
A proposition or starting point that is accepted as true or that is agreed to be true. See: assumption
References in periodicals archive ?
Selon la Cour supreme, de tels principes fournissent aux tribunaux les << premisses de theses constitutionnelles >> qui justifient la reconnaissance de nouvelles normes constitutionnelles juridiques ou d'exceptions a des normes existantes (27).
C, or as an inference (a syllogism) from two premisses A and B to the conclusion C.
87) But this is not an irrational leap, for "the process of choosing between positions based on different sets of premises is thus more a matter of intuition and finally conscience, than is a decision between different interpretations based on the same or closely similar sets of premisses.
D'apres les experts refractaires, elle se base sur de fausses premisses.
The Executive/Activist/Staff triangle (II) makes up, indeed, "the principal cohesive element," showing not only cohesive, centralizing and, in a diffuse way, disciplinary powers, but also "the power of innovation," understood always "in a certain direction, according to certain lines of force, certain perspectives, even certain premisses.
With regard to Hylas's rhetorical games in his confrontations with Silvandre, Chabett notes: "Assez bon sophiste, [Hylas] retourne les propositions de l'adversaire en ignorant ses premisses, en confondant le tout et la partie, le sujet et le predicat" [A rather good sophist, [Hylas] overturns the propositions of his adversary by ignoring the latter's premises, by confusing the whole and the part, the subject and the predicate] (402).
See also William Kneale and Martha Kneale, who claim that Aristotle's definition of a syllogism at the beginning of the Prior Analytics is a formula wide enough to cover almost any argument in which a conclusion is inferred from two or more premisses, and that it had already been used in that inclusive sense in the Topics.
This involves, contrary to the premisses of' "biographical" criticism, and as the remainder of this text shows, a psychology of the reader rather than of the author: a psychology of the effect, not the cause.
Tout d'abord, l'auteure sent le besoin de preciser ses origines nationales et religieuses, ce qui a le merite de clarifier honnetement les premisses a partir desquelles elle developpe son argumentation.
the inevitability with which a conclusion follows from a set of premisses (logical necessity), the Syriac translator must (mistakenly) have understood it in the sense of the modal or existential necessity of the connection between a subject and its predicate (e.
The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms (BATF) would be required to distribute a list of Federal licensees to the appropriate state or local law enforcement agency, and require, as a prerequisite to the issuance of a new license, that the business to be conducted not be prohibited by any state or local law applicable in the jurisdiction where the applicant's premisses are located.
The anthropologists I talk to who have done fieldwork in exotic societies and are committed social relativists or social constructivists will never tire of pointing out to me how the content of moral rules is quite different in "their" societies from "ours" and how this proves the essential soundness of their relativistic premisses.