prejudice

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prejudice

1. A preconceived judgment or opinion formed without factual knowledge.
2. Irrational hostility, hatred, or suspicion of a particular group, race, or religion.

prejudice

The maintenance of an adverse opinion about a person or class of persons in spite of evidence to the contrary. This is a common characteristic of the human being and is linked with the habit of arguing illogically from the particular to the general and the tendency to irrational chauvinism.
References in classic literature ?
If their praise is censure, your censure may be praise, for they are not more undiscerning, than you are prejudiced and unjust.
The reception of this person in the ball of Cedric the Saxon, was such as might have satisfied the most prejudiced enemy of the tribes of Israel.
Here I was accosted one day by an inhabitant of that place, where he had found the people so prejudiced against us, who desired to be admitted to confession.
But your son, senor, I suspect, is not prejudiced against Spanish poetry, but against those poets who are mere Spanish verse writers, without any knowledge of other languages or sciences to adorn and give life and vigour to their natural inspiration; and yet even in this he may be wrong; for, according to a true belief, a poet is born one; that is to say, the poet by nature comes forth a poet from his mother's womb; and following the bent that heaven has bestowed upon him, without the aid of study or art, he produces things that show how truly he spoke who said, 'Est Deus in nobis,' &c.
The same process must be repeated in every member of which the body is constituted; and the execution of the plans, framed by the councils of the whole, will always fluctuate on the discretion of the ill-informed and prejudiced opinion of every part.
You reason well, and your wit is bold, but you are too prejudiced.
Quick to the Louvre," said he, "to the Louvre without losing an instant, and let us endeavor to see the king before he is prejudiced by the cardinal.
But, indeed, I am not prejudiced beyond the power of conviction.
Of neither Darcy nor Wickham could she think without feeling she had been blind, partial, prejudiced, absurd.
As for the Widow Wycherly, tradition tells us that she was a great beauty in her day; but, for a long while past, she had lived in deep seclusion, on account of certain scandalous stories which had prejudiced the gentry of the town against her.
I suspect that in this comprehensive and (may I say) commonplace censure, you are not judging from yourself, but from prejudiced persons, whose opinions you have been in the habit of hearing.
I want you to withdraw the report that you had intended to lay before the House, on the ground that you have reasons to believe that the Commissioners have been prejudiced or misinformed, or something.