prefrontal


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Related to prefrontal: prefrontal leucotomy, Prefrontal cortex, prefrontal lobotomy

prefrontal

 [pre-frun´t'l]
1. situated in the anterior part of the frontal region or lobe.
2. the central part of the ethmoid bone.

pre·fron·tal

(prē-frŏn'tăl),
1. Denoting the anterior portion of the frontal lobe of the cerebrum.
2. Denoting the granular frontal cortex rostral to the premotor area.

prefrontal

/pre·fron·tal/ (-fron´t'l) situated in the anterior part of the frontal lobe or region.

prefrontal

(prē-frŭn′tl)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or situated in the anterior part of the frontal lobe.
2. Situated anterior to the frontal bone.

prefrontal

Pertaining to the front part of the frontal lobe of the brain.

prefrontal

1. situated in the anterior part of the frontal region or lobe of the brain.
2. the central part of the ethmoid bone.
References in periodicals archive ?
The researchers used repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on a specific area of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex to briefly alter activity in this brain region and consequently change the amount of punishment a person doled out.
A separate group of rats received optogenetic stimulation of a different brain region, the prelimbic prefrontal cortex (PrL-PFC).
The blunted prefrontal cortex response to fenfluramine release of serotonin likely underlies differences in intent and impulsivity that are proportional to the seriousness of suicidal acts.
Current dogma, however, is that restoring balance between the activity in left and right prefrontal cortices is more important than absolute activity in either side.
SPECT imaging shows increased or decreased activity in the temporal lobes and decreased prefrontal cortex activity.
They again found a response in the right prefrontal cortex that only occurred for the first signal in a series.
PTSD emerged in only 7 of 40 vets with ventromedial prefrontal cortex damage, conflicting with earlier evidence that inactivity in this area promotes PTSD.
The prefrontal cortex--the brain's "emergency brake," or center for judgment and self-control--is one such area.
As a young woman, Williams was schizophrenic and she underwent a prefrontal lobotomy and was institutionalized for the rest of her life.
Researchers know that a number of brain structures, including the prefrontal cortex, which is involved in language processing and memory, are involved in humor appreciation.
The researchers were then able to compare the 12 areas in the human brain region with the organization of the monkey prefrontal cortex.
The researchers found that parts of the prefrontal cortex take over when the hippocampus, the brain's key center of learning and memory formation, is disabled.