preexcitation

preexcitation

 [pre-ek″si-ta´shun]
abnormal premature activation of part of the ventricular myocardium, signifying conduction of some of the activating impulses by routes outside the normal ones.

pre·ex·ci·ta·tion

(prē'ek-sī-tā'shŭn),
Premature activation of part of the ventricular myocardium by an impulse that travels by an anomalous path and so avoids physiologic delay in the atrioventricular junction; an intrinsic part of the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

preexcitation

/pre·ex·ci·ta·tion/ (pre-ek″si-ta´shun) premature activation of a portion of the ventricles due to transmission of cardiac impulses along an accessory pathway not subject to the physiologic delay of the atrioventricular node; sometimes used as a synonym of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

preexcitation

[prē′eksitā′shən]
Etymology: L, prae + excitare, to arouse
activation of part of the ventricular myocardium earlier than would be expected if the activating impulses traveled only down the normal routes and had experienced a normal delay within the atrioventricular (AV) node. Preexcitation may be a result of either an AV accessory pathway (Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome), which is reflected on the electrocardiogram by a short P-R interval and a broad QRS complex, or an excessively fast intranodal pathway (Lown-Ganong-Levine syndrome), which manifests with a short P-R interval and a normal QRS complex. The degree of preexcitation is determined by the speed at which the impulse traverses the atrial tissue and the accessory pathway or the AV node. See also accessory pathway.

pre·ex·ci·ta·tion

(prē'ek-sī-tā'shŭn)
Premature activation of part of the ventricular myocardium by an impulse that travels by an anomalous path and so avoids physiologic delay in the atrioventricular junction; an intrinsic part of the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.
References in periodicals archive ?
Decimeter spatial resolution by using differential preexcitation BOTDA pulse technique, IEEE Sensors Journal, 11,2344-2348.
Cardiac rhabdomyomas can involve the cardiac conducting system and thereby may predispose an affected individual to ventricular preexcitation or other arrhythmias not only in infancy but also later in life.
Wolff-Parkinson-White type ventricular preexcitation may occur, as it does in other persons with Ebstein's anomaly of the tricuspid valve, and some, but not all, supraventricular arrhythmias in congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries are associated with a left-sided accessory pathway (1).
Exclusion criteria were as follows: acute coronary syndrome, prior myocardial infarction and coronary artery stenosis higher than 40% either in ectatic coronary artery or in the nonectatic coronary arteries, congestive heart failure, left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, valvular heart disease, permanent pacemaker implantation, atrial fibrillation, frequent ventricular preexcitation and atrioventricular conduction abnormalities, medications known to alter cardiac conduction, peripheral vascular diseases, pulmonary or neurological disease, pericarditis, congenital heart disease, alcohol abuse, and renal, hepatic, or thyroid disease.
Transgenic mouse model of ventricular preexcitation and atrioventricular reentrant tachycardia induced by an AMP-activated protein kinase loss-of-function mutation responsible for Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.
Various forms of WPW syndrome are described (exact WPW syndrome, latent ventricular preexcitation, permanent junctional reciprocating tachycardia) in a presence of aberrant atrioventricular pathways in heart.
Numerous reports have confirmed that TAS is a rapid, safe and effective means for evaluating and terminating SV arrhythmias in the pediatric population including infants [8, 9], as well as for localization of ventricular preexcitation sites before ablation procedures [10].
of Maastricht, the Netherlands) discuss variant forms of preexcitation syndromes that are not well known, and provide variant accessory pathways, their history and anatomy.
The presence of signs of preexcitation on resting ECG (a "delta wave") in a patient with history of paroxysmal regular palpitations suggests AVRT.
the Wolff-Parkinson-White pattern of ventricular preexcitation.