predisposition


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predisposition

 [pre-dis″po-zish´un]
a latent susceptibility to disease which may be activated under certain conditions.

pre·dis·po·si·tion

(prē'dis-pō-zish'ŭn),
A condition of special susceptibility to a disease.

predisposition

/pre·dis·po·si·tion/ (-dis-po-zish´un) a latent susceptibility to disease that may be activated under certain conditions.

predisposition

[-dis′pəzish′ən]
Etymology: L, prae + disponere, to dispose
a state of being particularly susceptible.

pre·dis·po·si·tion

(prē-dispŏ-zishŭn)
A condition of special susceptibility to a disease.

predisposition

A special susceptibility to a disease or disorder, as by the action of direct or indirect genetic or environmental factors.

predisposition

susceptibility to disease/condition

pre·dis·po·si·tion

(prē-dispŏ-zishŭn)
A condition of special susceptibility to a disease.

predisposition,

n an increased vulnerability to a particular disease based on genetic factors or the existence of certain underlying conditions not yet active or revealed.

predisposition

a latent susceptibility to disease which may be activated under certain conditions.
References in periodicals archive ?
It's fairly quick, painless and easy way to learn what genetic predispositions you may have.
Of these, 11 percent had mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, and the rest had mutations in 15 other predisposition genes, including the DNA repair genes PALB2, BARD1, and RAD51C.
However, this example clearly demonstrates that the more forceful the inducement, the more critical the showing of predisposition becomes.
The DNA is then analysed for predisposition to 25 diseases, including Alzheimer's, Multiple Sclerosis, heart disease, rheumatoid arthritis, obesity and seven different types of cancer, including breast, lung, skin and prostate.
Mr Andrew Baildam reviews the role of risk-reducing mastectomy as the only practical means of cancer prevention in this high-risk group of breast cancer predisposition gene carriers.
Mustelin and her associates pointed out that while previous studies have found that physical activity modified waist circumference and weight gain among twins with a genetic predisposition to obesity, those studies could not "quantify the effect of physical activity on the relative contribution of genetic and environmental effects on obesity.
They can impair the body's ability to repair and maintain tissues, and lead to a predisposition to inflammation.
On one hand, failure to take advantage of available technology to ascertain employee's predisposition to disease may result in employer violations of Occupational Safety and Health Administration regulations, as well as exposure to negligence-based lawsuits for failure to provide a safe workplace.
Pinker lists deference to experts and emotional predisposition for religious belief such as the efficacy of prayer.
As well as for sex, embryos can now be tested for blood type and for predisposition to certain diseases, such as Down Syndrome, spina bifida, and Alzheimer's--the treatment of which would be a financial drain on the health sciences.
One of the pregnant woman and 14 of the postpartum women had undergone surgery within the three months before diagnosis; eight and one, respectively, had a genetic predisposition to the condition, but for most women in both groups, this was its first occurrence.
To determine the actions of this chemical, Walker and colleagues studied rats with a genetic predisposition to developing uterine fibroids, exposing some of them to DES during their first week of life.