predigest

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predigest

(prē′dī-jĕst′, -dĭ-)
tr.v. predi·gested, predi·gesting, predi·gests
1. To subject (food) to partial digestion, usually through an enzymatic or chemical process, before ingestion.
2. To render in a simpler style or form.

pre′di·ges′tion n.
References in periodicals archive ?
Learning how to process information and draw conclusions is one of the most important outcomes of education, as opposed to only getting predigested content from texts and teachers.
It has been estimated that 75 percent of information we use in all professional business environments has been predigested by governments"
When information is always "high level," predigested by staffers, a CEO may be perceiving an artificial world, a virtual reality as it were, of cleanly manicured lawns.
But it is generally not the way history is taught in college and high school, where students are force-marched through predigested facts and dates.
This is perhaps the most radical challenge of Gaghan's thriller, for his way of storytelling questions the very assumptions of Washington's one-sided, simplistic, and predigested view of the world.
EFFORT IS THE LAST THING that's supposed to be required of a reader of fiction these days, Ben Marcus observes, with considerable dismay: "Language is meant to flow predigested, like liquid down a feeding tube.
Thus, humans construct knowledge; we do not receive and internalize predigested concepts without simultaneously reacting to them and engaging them within our own mental maps and previous experience" (Schmuck, 2001, p.
Without any alternatives to cow's milk formulas, kids were forced to take supplemental hypoallergenic formulas, such as Alimentum, which utilize predigested cow's milk proteins and are expensive.
We have developed a novel nanosensor method for the highly sensitive determination of selenium in predigested organic samples.
And besides, so much seemed to him at stake: not merely institutional change but the extinction of a form of life, the paganism of rural Southern Italy and of the "paleoindustrial" Roman borgate, working-class neighborhoods where adolescents had "barely even heard of the Madonna" but at least lived and judged from firsthand rather than predigested experience.
It's not the subject of that trial that intrigues me so much as The New York Times account of it, that preachers and preaching are in such a desperate situation that they have to resort to canned ideas, canned sermons, predigested thoughts in little gobbets, simply to fill in the time between the Gospel and the 'comfortable word,' or prayer of consecration.