predict

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predict

(pri-dikt′) [L. praedicere, to foretell]
To declare what will happen; foretell. In clinical observations, it is to make an educated estimate about the natural history of a disease or its prognosis.
predictable (-dikt′ă-bĕl), adjectivepredictive (-dik′tiv)
References in periodicals archive ?
is calculated for each predictor gender/target gender pairing.
The analysis of demographic variables indicated that predictors for eighth grade were similar to those found for seventh grade: male gender, black race and low or average academic achievement.
The chronic disease score, like the ASA score when other known risk factors for infection were taken into consideration, was a strong predictor of postoperative surgical site infection.
Respiratory rate was considered the most useful predictor (median 8.
During context switching, in addition to traditional branch predictor state saving techniques, SDFSM operational state can be quickly saved and restored using special hardware to read and save state on a single clock cycle.
After controlling for other outcome predictors, including UPCR and CRP, the researchers found that the adjusted annual risk of the composite end point in patients who were in the lowest tertile for NT-proBNP and had an undetectable TnT was 5%, climbing stepwise to 30% per year in those in the top tertile for NT-proBNP and a TnT greater than the median 0.
This contribution describes facilities of a Matlab environment for control of time-delay systems using three selected modifications of Smith Predictor (Matusu & Prokop, 2010b).
While the UEFA Euro 2008 winners, Spain, seem to be most bookmakers' favourite going into the tournament, the Castrol Predictor shows that they actually have only a 16.
However, extrinsic motivation was a negative predictor of achievement.
The study not only compared the lifestyle intervention subjects with placebo subjects, but additionally analyzed the effect of each lifestyle change within the lifestyle intervention group--weight loss, a reduced fat diet, and regular exercise--to determine which was the best predictor of reduced diabetes risk.
Finally, the authors point out that although TWA and IBL are associated with peripheral nerve damage, bone lead--another measure of chronic exposure--is a weak predictor of lead effects in the nervous system because it reflects only that lead stored in the bone compartment and not necessarily the cumulative blood lead to which peripheral nerves were exposed.