predation


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predation

Forensics
See Postmortem animal predation.

Health insurance
See Predatory pricing.

Public safety
See Sexual predator.

Sexology
See Predatory paraphilia.

predation

see PREDATOR.

predation

the characteristic of preying on other animals as a source of food. Can be a big cause of loss in animal flocks and herds, especially lambs. See also predatory.
References in periodicals archive ?
The early emergence of predation makes sense, says Paul Falkowski, an earth systems scientist at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, N.
While experimental predation rates may not represent actual levels of predation on natural nests, we expect that relative differences in rates of predation can inform a better understanding of declines of Common Nighthawks.
By three weeks of age, the predation totals can increase up to two-thirds of all newborn fawns.
On the New Jersey coast, for example, naticid predation can account for as much as 21% of Atlantic surfclam [Spisula solidissima (Dillwyn, 1817)] mortality (Weissberger & Grassle 2003), and in eastern Maine, the northern moonsnail [Lunatia heros (Say, 1822) (generic assignment based on Torigoe & Inaba [2011])] alone is estimated to consume more than 70% of juvenile softshell clams (Mya arenaria Linnaeus 1758) (Beal 2006).
agrili establishment and parasitism that would be simple to replicate, and would reduce predation on EAB eggs by predators without interfering with parasitism.
To address our question, we need information on the thermal conditions experienced by prey items in the field and the mechanism of predation by the predators.
According to study, naturally occurring fish predation by spiders has been reported from all continents with the exception of Antarctica.
Of the specimens collected, 58 had signs of predation including marks from scratches and bites.
But combining weevil predation with either burning or mowing significantly reduced the number of pods per plant, mature seeds per plant, and seed bank densities relative to weevil predation alone.
Specific topics include the method of multiple working hypotheses, the causes and effects of periodic fluctuations in the numbers of animals, the components of predation as revealed by a study of small-mammal predation of the European pine sawfly, the marginal value theorem of optimal foraging, guidelines for authorship of scientific articles, and public attitudes toward a suburban deer herd.
Hands-on demonstrations of predation are difficult in the classroom or laboratory setting, and so the topic is often presented through the use of a few standard examples, such as the classic example of population cycles in the Canadian lynx and snowshoe hare (as presented in Odum, 1953, and now ubiquitous in introductory biology textbooks), or through the use of computer simulations such as Populus (Alstad, 2007).