precordium


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precordium

 [pre-kor´de-um] (pl. precor´dia) (L.)
the region over the heart and lower thorax; adj., adj precor´dial.
Precordial points of the heart. From Lammon et al., 1995.

pre·cor·di·um

(prē-kōr'dē-ŭm),
Singular of precordia.

precordium

/pre·cor·di·um/ (-kor´de-um) pl. precor´dia   the region of the anterior surface of the body covering the heart and lower thorax.precor´dial

precordium

[-kôr′dē·əm]
Etymology: L, prae, before, cor, heart
the part of the front of the chest wall that overlays the heart and the epigastrium. precordial, adj.
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Precordium

pre·cor·di·um

(prē-kōr'dē-ŭm)
Singular of precordia.
Synonym(s): praecordium.

precordium

area of the chest wall over which the heart contractions can be palpated and auscultated; typically it is found on the ventral third of the left chest wall behind the elbow, which may be advanced cranially for better access.
References in periodicals archive ?
A patient with stab injury to the precordium and hemodynamic stability should be transferred to a level 1 trauma center.
Physical examination was remarkable for a 2/6 systolic ejection murmur heard throughout the precordium.
Physical examination was remarkable for acrocyanosis, microcephaly, cranial bruit, bilateral neck swelling, coarse breath sounds, and a hyperdynamic precordium with continuous murmur.
Cardiovascular examination at the referring hospital was remarkable for a grade II/VI systolic murmur and a quiet precordium.
Cardiovascular examination showed a hyperdynamic precordium with a grade II to III/VI harsh continuous murmur at the base.
Inverted T waves are found across the precordium and in leads III and aVF, where they are accompanied by small q waves; lead II shows neither q's nor inverted T's.
There was diffuse blanching erythroderma of the neck and anterior chest; there was a small, nontender, shallow ulceration on the hard palate; there was no palpable lymphadenopathy; the lungs were clear to auscultation; and a Grade II/VI systolic murmur was heard throughout the precordium.
Both could be heard over most of the precordium but were loudest at the sternal edge in the left second intercostal space (pulmonic area).
Cardiac injury from penetrating wounds of the precordium poses significant challenges.
Upon awakening approximately 1 hour later, he heard and felt a "purring" sensation over his precordium and was hospitalized.