preconscious

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preconscious

 [pre-kon´shus]
the part of the mind that is not in immediate awareness but can be consciously recalled with effort, one of the systems of Freud's topographic model of the mind.

pre·con·scious

(prē-kon'shŭs),
In psychoanalysis, one of the three divisions of the psyche according to Freud's topographic psychology, the other two being the conscious and unconscious; includes all ideas, thoughts, past experiences, and other memory impressions that with effort can be consciously recalled. Compare: foreconscious.

preconscious

/pre·con·scious/ (-kon´shus) the part of the mind not present in consciousness, but readily recalled into it.

preconscious

(prē-kŏn′shəs)
n.
The memories or feelings that are not part of one's immediate awareness but that can be recalled through conscious effort.

pre·con′scious adj.
pre·con′scious·ly adv.

preconscious

[-kon′shəs]
Etymology: L, prae, before, conscire, to be aware
1 adj, before the development of self-consciousness and self-awareness.
2 n, (in psychiatry) the mental function in which thoughts, ideas, emotions, or memories not in immediate awareness can be brought into the consciousness, usually through associations, without encountering any intrapsychic resistance or repression.
3 n, the mental phenomena capable of being recalled, although not present in the conscious mind.

preconscious

Psychiatry adjective Referring to thoughts that are not in immediate awareness but that can be recalled by conscious effort

pre·con·scious

(prē-kon'shŭs)
psychoanalysis One of the three divisions of the psyche, the other two being the conscious and unconscious; includes all ideas, thoughts, past experiences, and other memory impressions that with effort can be consciously recalled.
Compare: foreconscious
References in periodicals archive ?
We have determined that opaque recklessness suffices for criminal responsibility where the opaquely reckless actor (1) consciously adverts to the dangerous nature of her conduct and (2) preconsciously understands that her conduct is dangerous because it presents a substantial and unjustifiable risk that either a material element exists or will result from her conduct.
While I do not mean to imply that all accidents are actually instances of opaque recklessness, there are those cases where an actor should be held accountable--where the actor is aware that he is presenting some risk and preconsciously recognizes the specific risk presented.
The defendant will argue that he did not realize, even preconsciously, that death would result; the prosecutor will contend the defendant was opaquely reckless; and the jury will decide.
But such an instruction is necessary if we want to guarantee that those opaquely reckless actors who preconsciously appreciate the risks involved are held accountable for their actions and do not slip between the cracks in the Model Penal Code.
For a contextual element to be assimilated, it must be preconsciously judged to be similar to the developing experience or to important elements of the task or to important persistent concerns or desires (and hence, in the language used earlier, pertinent to the overarching task of bringing forth the most useful experience or response in the moment).
The guesser is preconsciously judging the extrasensory content to be sufficiently congruent with the demands of the task and one's desires involving it that the content is assimilated into the response (impulse, image, association, or whatever) and is then used to guide a correct choice.
This model implies that preconsciously the mind draws from all its potential sources to find the most adaptive response to a situation or bring the most important issue to the stage of consciousness.
Extrasensory information is presumed to combine additively with sensory information when it is preconsciously understood to be contextually useful in the interpretation of the sensory information.
In that marginal awareness, psi information is not transformed into something fragmented or metaphorical, although it might appear to be; it preconsciously alerts us to classes of potential meaning that help us to interpret the sensory events to come, and these activated classes of meaning can sometimes be glimpsed as such.
11) During such times, we preconsciously sustain a directional tendency in regard to the incipient meaning in order to generate helpful allusions toward the desired understanding.
Rao (1962, 1991) developed a conception of psi process as inherently and preconsciously bidirectional, and produced many innovative studies demonstrating the efficacy of this concept.