precipitate

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precipitate

 [pre-sip´ĭ-tāt]
1. to cause settling in solid particles of a substance in solution.
2. a deposit of solid particles settled out of a solution.
3. to cause an event or occurrence.
4. (pre-sip´i-tat) occurring with undue rapidity, as precipitate labor.

pre·cip·i·tate

(prē-sip'i-tāt),
1. To cause a substance in solution to separate out as a solid.
2. A solid separated out from a solution or suspension; a floc or clump, such as that resulting from the mixture of a specific antigen and its antibody.
3. Accumulation of inflammatory cells on the corneal endothelium in uveitis (keratic precipitates).
[L. praecipito, pp. -atus, to cast headlong]

precipitate

/pre·cip·i·tate/ (-sip´ĭ-tāt)
1. to cause settling in solid particles of substance in solution.
2. a deposit of solid particles settled out of a solution.
3. occurring with undue rapidity.

precipitate

[prəsip′itāt, -it]
Etymology: L, praecipitare, to cast down
1 v, to cause a substance to separate or settle out of solution.
2 n, a substance that has separated from or settled out of a solution.
3 adj, occurring hastily or unexpectedly.

pre·cip·i·tate

(prĕ-sipi-tāt, -tăt)
1. To cause a substance in solution to separate as a solid.
2. A solid separated out from a solution or suspension; a floc or clump, such as that resulting from the mixture of a specific antigen and its antibody.
3. Accumulation of inflammatory cells on the corneal endothelium in uveitis (keratic precipitates).
[L. praecipito, pp. -atus, to cast headlong]

precipitate

solid separated from solution/suspension

pre·cip·i·tate

(prĕ-sipi-tāt, -tăt)
1. To cause a substance in solution to separate out as a solid.
2. A solid separated out from a solution or suspension; a floc or clump, such as that resulting from mixture of a specific antigen and its antibody.
[L. praecipito, pp. -atus, to cast headlong]

precipitate (prēsip´itāt),

n an insoluble solid substance that forms from chemical reactions between solutions.

precipitate

1. to cause settling of a soluble substance in solution.
2. a deposit of solid particles settled out of a solution.
3. occurring with undue rapidity, as precipitate labor.
References in periodicals archive ?
It seems that brains function in a state of "self-organized criticality" on the edge between orderliness and turbulence--that is, shifting precipitately (precipitously too) between these extremes rather than chuntering along in middle-spectrum cognitive suburbia.
Once the power to enforce conformity and suppress dissent declines in states where there has been a state religion, religious belief itself declines precipitately, for it is seen as having chosen the wrong side of history.
and would-be novelist, whom she consented to marry rather precipitately.
Perhaps not as precipitately as a government that is voted out of office but nevertheless there is usually a day of reckoning.
While important circular instructions for the diagnosis and compensation of common occupational diseases have been promulgated by the COIDA Commissioner, the provincial medical advisory panels initially established in 2004 in the Western Cape, and a year later in KZN, were precipitately closed down for dubious reasons despite providing a much more efficient and cost-effective service at provincial rather than central level.
From figures 3 and 4 the quasi-real series are always close to the real-time series, while the nearly real series reach their peak later than the full sample series, in 1990Q2, but fall precipitately from that point.
Last summer's war in Georgia, and the Kremlin's habitual efforts to destabilize Ukraine's pro-Western government, serve as warnings for what Lukashenko can expect if he moves precipitately.
Wilson quotes from Pontopiddan at considerable length, emphasizing the bishop's belief that Krakens were so enormous that they had sometimes been mistaken for islands (on which, of course, one should be cautious about landing); that they possessed huge tentacles with giant suckers on them; that they could potentially seize ships in their tentacles and thus destroy them; and that, when descending precipitately into the sea, they created dangerous maelstroms.
When she finishes, she throws "down the papers in terrible expectation of she knew not what; precipitately casting off her dress, she hurried into bed, as the abbey clock struck three, and covering herself completely with the clothes .
As Sanchi demonstrates, Bude finished the Commentarii somewhat precipitately, and his preface to Francois Ier shows that he dedicated the work to the king to persuade him to adhere to his cultural obligations.