precentral gyrus


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Related to precentral gyrus: postcentral gyrus

gyrus

 [ji´rus] (pl. gy´ri) (L.)
one of the many convolutions of the surface of the cerebral hemispheres caused by infolding of the cortex, separated by fissures or sulci; called also cerebral gyrus.
angular gyrus one continuous anteriorly with the supramarginal gyrus.
annectent gyri various small folds on the cerebral surface that are too inconstant to bear specific names; called also gyri transitivi.
Broca's gyrus inferior frontal gyrus.
central gyrus, anterior precentral gyrus.
central gyrus, posterior postcentral gyrus.
cerebral gyrus gyrus.
Cerebral gyri. From Applegate, 1996.
cingulate gyrus (gyrus cin´guli) an arch-shaped convolution situated just above the corpus callosum.
frontal gyrus any of the three (inferior, middle, and superior) gyri of the frontal lobe.
fusiform gyrus one on the inferior surface of the hemisphere between the inferior temporal and parahippocampal gyri, consisting of a lateral (lateral occipitotemporal gyrus) and a medial (medial occipitotemporal gyrus) part.
hippocampal gyrus (gyrus hippocam´pi) one on the inferior surface of each cerebral hemisphere, lying between the hippocampal and collateral fissures; called also parahippocampal gyrus.
infracalcarine gyrus (lingual gyrus) one on the occipital lobe that forms the inferior lip of the calcerine sulcus and, together with the cuneus, the visual cortex.
marginal gyrus the middle frontal gyrus.
occipital gyrus any of the three (superior, middle, and inferior) gyri of the occipital lobe.
occipitotemporal gyrus, lateral the lateral portion of the fusiform gyrus.
occipitotemporal gyrus, medial the medial portion of the fusiform gyrus.
orbital gyri irregular gyri on the orbital surface of the frontal lobe.
parahippocampal gyrus hippocampal gyrus.
paraterminal gyrus a thin sheet of gray matter in front of and ventral to the genu of the corpus callosum.
postcentral gyrus the convolution of the frontal lobe immediately behind the central sulcus; the primary sensory area of the cerebral cortex; called also posterior central gyrus.
precentral gyrus the convolution of the frontal lobe immediately in front of the central sulcus; the primary motor area of the cerebral cortex; called also anterior central gyrus.
gyrus rec´tus a cerebral convolution on the orbital aspect of the frontal lobe.
supramarginal gyrus that part of the inferior parietal convolution which curves around the upper end of the fissure of Sylvius.
temporal gyrus any of the gyri of the temporal lobe, including inferior, middle, superior, and transverse temporal gyri; the more prominent of the latter (anterior transverse temporal gyrus) represents the cortical center for hearing.
gy´ri transiti´vi annectent gyri.
uncinate gyrus the uncus.

pre·cen·tral gy·rus

[TA]
bounded posteriorly by the central sulcus and anteriorly by the precentral sulcus.

precentral gyrus

[-sen′trəl]
Etymology: L, prae + Gk, kentron, center, gyros, turn
a convolution of the cerebral hemisphere immediately anterior to the central sulcus of the cerebrum in each hemisphere. It is the location of the motor strip that controls voluntary movements of the contralateral side of the body. Also called anterior central gyrus.

pre·cen·tral gy·rus

(prē-sen'trăl jī'rŭs) [TA]
Bounded posteriorly by the central sulcus and anteriorly by the precentral sulcus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, hands and face (which has the highest density of sensory receptors, respectively, motor innervations) are controlled by the largest area of precentral gyrus (motor) and postcentral gyrus (sensory).
5T) fluency bilateral frontal gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus, anterior cingulate, and right precentral gyrus among patients with first-episode schizophrenia.
Results showed that difference in mean oxy-Hb values in the right area of the inferior frontal region and precentral gyrus significantly discriminated Japanese from non-Japanese groups (right 3ch: Wilks' X= 0.
They found pronounced group differences (heightened levels of gyrification in active meditation practitioners) across a wide swatch of the cortex, including the left precentral gyrus, the left and right anterior dorsal insula, the right fusiform gyrus and the right cuneus.
For instance, repertitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) could be provided over the precentral gyrus of the left hemisphere during wakefulness while the subject performs a task involving dexterity of the right hand.
Eight significant clusters were found with increased brain activation from pre- to post-training, compared with non-CRT patients [Table 2] and [Figure 2], (1) the left inferior frontal gyrus (1120 mm [sup]3, BA9); (2) the left medial frontal gyrus (512 mm [sup]3, BA32); (3) the right middle frontal gyrus (464 mm [sup]3, BA6); (4) the left precentral gyrus (416 mm [sup]3, BA6); (5) the right postcentral gyrus (416 mm [sup]3, BA2); (6) the left medial frontal gyrus (352 mm [sup]3, BA6); (7) the right sub-gyral (296 mm [sup]3, BA6); and (8) the left sub-gyral (216 mm [sup]3, BA6).
Combining structural MRI and fMRI, Ye and colleagues [27] were the first to document decreased density of the right dorsolateral prefrontal grey matter among patients with depression; they also observed decreased FC between the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and right parietal lobe and increased FC between the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and the left dorsal cingulate cortex, left parahippocampal gyrus, thalamus and precentral gyrus.
Some areas of the brain were activated during both lying and truth-telling, but there were five activated areas unique to lying: two in the frontal lobe (the right precentral gyrus and the left medial frontal gyrus), two in the temporal lobe (the right hippocampus and the right middle temporal lobe), and the anterior cingulate of the limbic lobe.
sup][16] reported that gray matter volume was reduced in the left precentral gyrus and right fusiform gyrus in patients with depressive cognitive tendencies compared to that in healthy controls.