preceptorship

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preceptorship

 [pre-sep´ter-ship] (pl. pre·cep·tor·ship)
a short-term relationship between a student as novice and an experienced staff person (such as a professional nurse) as the preceptor who provides individual attention to the student's learning needs and feedback regarding performance; students experience relative independence in making decisions, setting priorities, management of time, and patient care activities.

preceptorship

(prĭ-sĕp′tər-shĭp′)
n.
A period of practical training for a student or novice under the supervision of a preceptor.

preceptorship

[-sep′tərship′]
Etymology: L, prae + capere, to take up
1 the position of teacher or instructor.
2 a defined period of time in which two people (a nurse with a student nurse or an experienced nurse with a new graduate) work together so that the less experienced person can learn and apply knowledge and skills in the practice setting with the help of the more experienced person.

preceptorship

A structured, supportive period of transition from learning to applying a complex skill (e.g., nursing) that requires a long and rigourous period of education. Preceptorship is similar to apprenticeship and serves as a bridge during the transition from student nurse to practitioner.

preceptorship

Graduate education A period of hands-on training under a physician or surgeon skilled in a technique–eg, placement of a stent in a coronary artery, or laparoscopic surgery. See Laparoscopic surgery, Paradoxical movement.

preceptorship,

n the position of teacher or instructor to a new or recent graduate.