pralidoxime chloride

pral·i·dox·ime chlor·ide

(pral'i-dok'sēm klōr'īd, prā-li-),
Used to restore the inactivated cholinesterase activity resulting from organophosphate poisoning; has some limited value as an antagonist of the carbamate type of cholinesterase inhibitors that are used in the treatment of myasthenia gravis.

pralidoxime chloride

[pral′ədok′sēm]
a cholinesterase reactivator.
indications It is prescribed as an antidote for organophosphate poisoning and drug overdosage in the treatment of myasthenia gravis.
contraindications Known hypersensitivity to this drug prohibits its use. It is contraindicated in poisoning by carbamate insecticides that react with pralidoxime.
adverse effects Among the most serious adverse effects are dizziness, tachycardia, hyperventilation, and muscle weakness. These reactions are most common when the drug is injected too rapidly.

pral·i·dox·ime chlor·ide

(pral'i-dok'sēm klōr'īd)
A chloride salt of the oxime pralidoxime; the salt is used as an antidote in cases of poisoning by organophosphorous anticholinesterases (including organophosphorous pesticides and nerve agents).

pralidoxime chloride

(prăl″ĭ-dŏks′ēm)
A cholinesterase reactivator used in treating poisoning due to certain pesticides or drugs with anticholinesterase activity.
References in periodicals archive ?
A second substance, called pralidoxime chloride, must be administered to release the nerve gas from the enzyme and destroy it.
Two drugs,atropine and pralidoxime chloride,have been used by the military as antidotes for nerve agent poisoning.
King plans to submit applications to the DHS for other similar auto-injector technologies: DuoDote([TM]) (single, dual-chambered auto-injector containing two separate antidotes for organophosphorus poisoning, atropine and pralidoxime chloride); and the Mark I[TM] Nerve Agent Auto-Injector Kit (two separate auto-injectors, one containing atropine and one containing pralidoxime chloride, both antidotes for organophosphorus poisoning).
Peter Sadowski director of the device group operations for Antares, said that military officials had approached Antares, and found its platforms "appear suitable for the delivery of many known antidotes to nerve gas and other biological threats, including atropine, pralidoxime chloride, morphine, and diazepam.
In the independent clinical study the new automatic injector and the Mark I Kit were tested on 12 healthy male and 12 healthy female subjects to determine the relative bioavailability (absorption) of two nerve agent antidotes, atropine and pralidoxime chloride.
Two separate STI auto-injectors are currently used for this procedure to self-inject atropine and pralidoxime chloride.
1 million from the DoD for the Mark-I Antidote Kit, which consists of two injectors, the AtroPen Auto-Injector, filled with pralidoxime chloride.