pragmatism

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prag·ma·tism

(prag'mă-tizm),
A philosophy emphasizing practical applications and consequences of beliefs and theories, that the meaning of ideas or things is determined by the testability of the idea in real life.
[G. pragma (pragmat-), thing done]

pragmatism

[prag′mətiz′əm]
Etymology: Gk, pragma, deed
a philosophy concerned with actual practice and practical results as opposed to theory and speculation.

prag·ma·tism

(prag'mă-tizm)
A philosophy emphasizing practical applications and consequences of beliefs and theories; that the meaning of ideas or things is determined by the testability of the idea in real life.
[G. pragma (pragmat-), thing done]

pragmatism

1. Action determined by the need to respond to immediate necessity or to achieve a particular practical result, rather than by established policy or dogma.
2. The philosophic principle that the truth and meaning of an idea is entirely relative to its practical outcome.
References in periodicals archive ?
Idealism and pragmatism offer image of human as education subject are close in directions and fur from eachothers of other cases.
In Idealism, human leads to knowledge by ration, whereas in pragmatism, obtaining knowledge by research scientific method.
Stantov says that pragmatism educational philosophy usage in Bulgaria education system is valuable according to emphasizing this school on progression, democracy, human and science.
Shock also says that pragmatism philosophy moves to progression According done studies in this field and mentioned, we can conclude that totally some studies believes to Idealism points of view pragmatics and other to pragmatism pragmatics in education.
Unless deep differences in Idealism and pragmatism philosophy bases and also serious differences in determining education purposes, because main education purpose in every two viewpoints have been learning know ledges and skills and enabling students for future meeting needs common faces in purposes are natural action.
Pragmatism by focusing on; Fact pragmatic theory (measuring one thought by functional criterion and its advantage) proximate education to veal life and so many in consistencies between science and practice, school and its external social environment destroy person and society, discipline and freedom and also instrument and purpose.
Finally, the eighth chapter, by Danielle Macbeth, starts from Peirce and Frege and applies pragmatism to the philosophy of logic and mathematics.
Though the Kantian background of the realism debate is obvious, Misak's collection does not particularly illuminate this aspect of pragmatism.
Despite my minor reservations, this collection is an important addition to the literature on pragmatism and its relevance today.