pragmatic


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pragmatic

[pragmat′ik]
pertaining to a belief that ideas are valuable only in terms of their consequences.

pragmatism

(prăg′mă-tĭzm) [Gr. pragma, a thing done, + -ismos, condition]
The belief that the practical application of a principle should be the determining factor in decision making.
pragmatic (prăg-măt′ĭk), adjective
References in periodicals archive ?
Given that ratings of pragmatic appropriateness are influenced by rater variation, some studies instead conducted a seemingly more objective analysis of speech act realization strategies, predominantly using the coding system from the Cross-Cultural Speech Act Realization Project (CCSARP; Blum-Kulka, House, & Kasper, 1989).
Their study found that speakers were in fact able to tease apart pragmatic elements of meaning from semantic ones but that the ability to do so is sensitive both to the particular type of phrase used in the sentence as well as the point of view a speaker adopts.
Perkins claims the cause or definition of pragmatic impairment is not as important as the actual behaviors observed.
What I miss is attention to some of the foundational issues: Prince's assessment of the relative merits of Centering Theory and neoGricean pragmatics, for example, would have gone a little way to satisfying the little philosopher in all of us who are drawn to semantic/pragmatic questions.
Jordan defends pragmatic arguments, especially the Jamesian Wager, in two technical chapters, Chapters 3 and 4, which contain insights into the domain of probability and decision theory.
Security software maker Fortress Technologies, a Pragmatic customer since 2004, counts about 225 Software Planner users among its employees.
One of the key tools that evolved to fill this gap was the pragmatic RCT.
Specific pragmatic aspects investigated in adults with aphasia include communication acts (Gurland, Chwat, & Wollner, 1982; Wambaugh, Thompson, Doyle, & Camarata, 1991), speech acts (Doyle, Thompson, Oleyar, Wambaugh, & Jackson, 1994; Prinz, 1980; Wilcox & Davis, 1977), discourse analysis (Armstrong, 1987, 1991; Bottenberg & Lemme, 1991; Guilford & O'Connor, 1982; Mentis & Prutting, 1987) and use of nonverbal communication (Behrmann & Penn, 1984; Cicone, Wapner, Foldi, Zurif, & Gardner, 1979; Glosser, Weiner, & Kaplan, 1986; May, David, & Thomas, 1988).
This institutional framework provides a regular, ongoing formal intellectual platform for promoting interdisciplinary discourse amongst scholars and students toward acquiring a profound and sophisticated understanding of the Islamic worldview in relation to science and technology and its clarification in terms of cognitive, pragmatic and axiological directions for empirical and technical research in the challenging global context of contemporary scientific and technological enterprise.
That was my first experience with his opposition to so-called pragmatic liberalism.
Such pragmatic principles and such manipulation of public opinion are applied across the board in Canadian politics.
Second Metropolis: Pragmatic Pluralism in Gilded Age Chicago, Silver Age Moscow, and Meiji Osaka.