ethics

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Related to Practical Ethics: Applied ethics

ethics

 [eth´iks]
1. a branch of philosophy dealing with values pertaining to human conduct, considering the rightness and wrongness of actions and the goodness or badness of the motives and ends of such actions.
2. systematic rules or principles governing right conduct. Each practitioner, upon entering a profession, is invested with the responsibility to adhere to the standards of ethical practice and conduct set by the profession. adj., adj eth´ical.
applied ethics practical ethics.
descriptive ethics a type of nonnormative ethics that simply reports what people believe, how they reason, and how they act.
medical ethics the values and guidelines governing decisions in medical practice.
nonnormative ethics ethics whose objective is to establish what factually or conceptually is the case, not what ethically ought to be the case. Two types are descriptive ethics and metaethics.
normative ethics an approach to ethics that works from standards of right or good action. There are three types of normative theories: virtue theories, deontological theories, and teleological theories.
nursing ethics the values and ethical principles governing nursing practice, conduct, and relationships. The Code for Nurses, adopted by the American Nurses' Association (ANA) in 1950 and revised periodically, is intended to provide definite standards of practice and conduct that are essential to the ethical discharge of the nurse's responsibility. Further information on the Code, interpretative statements that clarify it, and guidance in implementing it in specific situations can be obtained from committees and councils on nursing practice of State Nurses' Associations or from the ANA Nursing Practice Department.
practical ethics the attempt to work out the implications of general theories for specific forms of conduct and moral judgment; formerly called applied ethics.
professional ethics the ethical norms, values, and principles that guide a profession and the ethics of decisions made within the profession.

eth·ics

(eth'iks),
The branch of philosophy that deals with the distinction between right and wrong, with the moral consequences of human actions.
[G. ethikos, arising from custom, fr. ethos, custom]

ethics

[eth′iks]
Etymology: Gk, ethikos, moral duty
the science or study of moral values or principles, including ideals of autonomy, beneficence, and justice. ethical, adj.

ethics

(1) The study of fundamental principles which define values and determine moral duties and obligations.
 
(2) Moral codes of practice concerned with: behaviour (moral conduct)—e. g. unprofessional behaviour, such as direct discrimination; legal, religious, social and personal concerns (moral issues); and debates within society—e.g. euthanasia vs. prolonging the life of a terminally-ill person.

eth·ics

(eth'iks)
1. The branch of philosophy that deals with the distinction between right and wrong, with the moral consequences of human actions.
2. nursing Philosophy or code about what is ideal in human character and conduct; principles of right or wrong accepted by individual or group; study of morals and moral choices.
[G. ethikos, arising from custom, fr. ethos, custom]

ethics

the principles of proper professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the health care professional, patients and colleagues

ethics (eˑ·thiks),

n the standards of conduct that direct a group or indi-vidual. In particular, it relates to the appropriate use of the power held by a group or individual.

eth·ics

(eth'iks)
The branch of philosophy that deals with the distinction between right and wrong and with the moral consequences of human actions.
[G. ethikos, arising from custom, fr. ethos, custom]

ethics (eth´iks),

n 1. the science of moral obligation; a system of moral principles, quality, or practice.
n 2. the moral obligation to render to the patient the best possible quality of dental service and to maintain an honest relationship with other members of the profession and mankind in general.
ethics, dental,
n See ethics, professional.
ethics, professional,
n the principles and norms of proper professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of health care professionals themselves and their conduct toward patients and fellow practitioners, including the actions taken in the care of patients and family members.

ethics

rules or principles which govern right conduct. Each practitioner, upon entering a profession, is invested with the responsibility to adhere to the standards of ethical practice and conduct set by the profession.

code of ethics
the written rules of ethics.
veterinary ethics
the values and guidelines governing decisions in veterinary practice.

Patient discussion about ethics

Q. The cobbler's shoes are never fixed A bit philosophical/ethical question: do you think it’s a appropriate to an alternative therapist to treat people with disease he or she has and can’t cure himself?

A. Even dietitian can suffer from depression and eat too much, or a gym coach that suffers from injury that prevents him or her from exercising. The knowledge and capabilities are not dependent on the specific situation of the therapist, not to mention the many explanations for such cases.

However, I do agree it may seem a bit suspicious…

More discussions about ethics
References in periodicals archive ?
Before lending these matters the earnestness all involved seem to regard as their birthright, one should point out that both Singer and his critics have established a sort of mini-industry on the back of the 'controversy', with Singer selling more copies of the German edition of Practical Ethics in the period 1989-1990 than in the previous five years when sales were sluggish, while his critics have published a small library of books, including some which oddly enough, claim to be contributions against rather than to the debate they nominally refuse to engage with.
His books include Practical Ethics, One World, and most recently, The Life You Can Save.
He writes that 'there is still much resistance to this research, particularly the neuroscience of ethics' potential contribution to inform practical ethics and real-world decision making' (201).
Julian Savulescu and colleagues from UK's Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics at the University of Oxford, reported the survey's results in the journal.
Moral inference, again based on a means--end relation, plays a role in practical ethics.
Julian Savulescu is the Uehiro Chair in Practical Ethics at the University of Oxford.
In today's practical ethics, (1) there are firm rules but very few absolutes.
Ethics columns by Deni Elliott, director of the Practical Ethics Center at the University of Montana, are available on the site, as well.
In her speech, "The Death of Objective Reporting," Deni Elliott, professor of ethics and director of the Practical Ethics Center at the University of Montana, said journalists today are caught in a "clash of paradigms' - the old style of straight objective reporting vs.
James Giordano, PhD, Chair of Academic Programs and Director of the Center for Neurotechnology Studies at the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies, and Senior Research Associate at the Wellcome Centre for Neuroethics and Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics, University of Oxford, UK.
Resisting corporate corruption; cases in practical ethics from Enron through the financial crisis, 2d ed.
This is a conclusion worth thinking about, since moral line-drawing, in one way or another, is the norm in practical ethics.

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