pox


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

pox

 [poks]
any eruptive or pustular disease, especially one caused by a virus, such as chickenpox, cowpox, or smallpox.

pox

(poks),
1. An eruptive disease, usually qualified by a descriptive prefix; for example, smallpox, cowpox, chickenpox. See the specific term.
2. Archaic or colloquial term for syphilis.
[var. of pl. pocks]

pox

(poks) any eruptive or pustular disease, especially one caused by a virus, e.g., chickenpox, cowpox, etc.

pox

(pŏks)
n.
1. A disease such as chickenpox or smallpox, characterized by purulent skin eruptions that may leave pockmarks.
2. Syphilis.
3. Misfortune or calamity.

pox

Etymology: ME, pokkes, pustules
1 any of several vesicular or pustular exanthematous diseases terminating in scars.
2 the pitlike scars of smallpox or chicken pox.
3 archaic. syphilis.

pox

Infection disease See Chickenpox, Smallpox.

pox

(poks)
1. An eruptive disease, usually qualified by a descriptive prefix, e.g., smallpox, cowpox, chickenpox.
2. An eruption, first papular then pustular, occurring in chronic antimony poisoning.
3. Archaic or colloquial term for syphilis (also called great pox).
[var. of pl. pocks]

pox

1. Any of the various infectious diseases, such as CHICKENPOX or cowpox, that cause blistering skin rashes. Some are caused by POXVIRUSES. Chickenpox is caused by a HERPES virus.
2. A slang term for SYPHILIS, which is not a pox.

Pox

A pus-filled bump on the skin.
Mentioned in: Smallpox

pox

(poks)
An eruptive disease, usually qualified by a descriptive prefix; e.g., smallpox, cowpox, chickenpox.
[var. of pl. pocks]

pox

a group of diseases caused by poxviruses and affecting primarily the skin and manifested by a characteristic progression of lesions from erythema to papule to vesicle to pustule to a round, reddish, raised scab about 0.5 inch diameter to a pock mark which remains at the site of lesions after healing. Includes buffalopox, camelpox, canarypox, catpox, cowpox, ectromelia (2), elephantpox, fowlpox, goatpox, horsepox, monkeypox, parrotpox, pseudocowpox, rabbitpox, sealpox, sheeppox, swinepox.
References in periodicals archive ?
Unusual disseminated lesions of poxvirus in psittacines resembling canary pox.
The research also found that some squirrels had developed antibodies to the pox virus, which suggest that they encountered the pox and then survived it, but we still don't know whether this means they are now immune to the disease.
A total of 1,505 breakthrough cases of chicken pox were reported within the study cohort of 7,585 children in the 14 years following varicella vaccination.
The chicken pox rate among the children between 2006 and 2010 was 461.
So there was the panicked ring round of parents to warn everyone at the party, whose children hadn't had chicken pox.
Research on 3,000 parents found most would send their sick child to school, with only 12 per cent saying they would keep them off for chicken pox, nine per cent for measles and three per cent for worms.
In many cases, only one or two infected tits will be seen in one area, but as the avian pox summer season steps up a gear the RSPB predicts a rise in the number of cases over the coming months.
They have interpreted the different visions of the pox as constructions, but they do not do so from the present-day political standpoint of the perhaps outmoded fashion of critical social studies in science and medicine, which is a product of the 1970s but which still dominates much of the history of medicine.
Instead, The Great Pox is a model for writing the social history of a disease, painting a rich and complex picture of Renaissance understandings and experiences of the illness.
Apparently the side-effects of chicken pox on a adult can be particularly nasty but we'll just have to wait and see how it develops.
The canary pox vaccine would be a delivery system for genetic material for HIV," says Connie Celum, principal investigator for the University of Washington's HIVNET site, "The hope is that the combination will stimulate both arms of the immune system: an antibody response and a cellular response.
Working with Ravelonandro, who is with the INRA Centre de Recherche Agronomique in Bordeaux, France, Scorza got the gene for the coat protein directly from the plum pox virus.