pox


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

pox

 [poks]
any eruptive or pustular disease, especially one caused by a virus, such as chickenpox, cowpox, or smallpox.

pox

(poks),
1. An eruptive disease, usually qualified by a descriptive prefix; for example, smallpox, cowpox, chickenpox. See the specific term.
2. Archaic or colloquial term for syphilis.
[var. of pl. pocks]

pox

(poks) any eruptive or pustular disease, especially one caused by a virus, e.g., chickenpox, cowpox, etc.

pox

(pŏks)
n.
1. A disease such as chickenpox or smallpox, characterized by purulent skin eruptions that may leave pockmarks.
2. Syphilis.
3. Misfortune or calamity.

pox

Etymology: ME, pokkes, pustules
1 any of several vesicular or pustular exanthematous diseases terminating in scars.
2 the pitlike scars of smallpox or chicken pox.
3 archaic. syphilis.

pox

Infection disease See Chickenpox, Smallpox.

pox

(poks)
1. An eruptive disease, usually qualified by a descriptive prefix, e.g., smallpox, cowpox, chickenpox.
2. An eruption, first papular then pustular, occurring in chronic antimony poisoning.
3. Archaic or colloquial term for syphilis (also called great pox).
[var. of pl. pocks]

pox

1. Any of the various infectious diseases, such as CHICKENPOX or cowpox, that cause blistering skin rashes. Some are caused by POXVIRUSES. Chickenpox is caused by a HERPES virus.
2. A slang term for SYPHILIS, which is not a pox.

Pox

A pus-filled bump on the skin.
Mentioned in: Smallpox

pox

(poks)
An eruptive disease, usually qualified by a descriptive prefix; e.g., smallpox, cowpox, chickenpox.
[var. of pl. pocks]

pox

a group of diseases caused by poxviruses and affecting primarily the skin and manifested by a characteristic progression of lesions from erythema to papule to vesicle to pustule to a round, reddish, raised scab about 0.5 inch diameter to a pock mark which remains at the site of lesions after healing. Includes buffalopox, camelpox, canarypox, catpox, cowpox, ectromelia (2), elephantpox, fowlpox, goatpox, horsepox, monkeypox, parrotpox, pseudocowpox, rabbitpox, sealpox, sheeppox, swinepox.
References in periodicals archive ?
As the POX Hub ramps up, we expect TCC to decline to slightly above USD500/oz in 2020, a level more in line with peers.
We would not routinely expect nurseries or GP surgeries to contact us about cases of chicken pox, because it is usually a mild illness and most healthy children recover with no complications.
Molecular detection of sheep pox virus: According to manufacturer`s instruction, DNA was extracted from skin and lung samples as well as commercial live attenuated sheep pox virus as positive control using DNeasy Blood and Tissue Kit (QIAGEN, USA).
According to a medical specialist, receiving a chicken pox vaccine is the best way to prevent contracting the illness.
The shifting incidences of chicken pox and shingles, however, were predicted years before they occurred.
Differentiation of sheep pox and goatpoxviruses by sequence analysis and PCR-RFLP of P32 gene.
Humans can be infected by sheep pox, but we have not yet registered such cases in Pyatimar," the mayor said.
Prevention of Chicken Pox in Pregnancy: The routine infection control process can be useful in prevention of chicken pox.
As well as displacing red squirrels from their habitat, grey squirrels also carry the squirrel pox virus, which they have spread to the reds.
But this squirrel survived the pox, which is great news.
The doctors are mulling over carrying out a research on adult chicken pox owing to this " different pattern".
Over the entire follow-up period, the incidence rate of chicken pox in this cohort was 9 to 10 times lower than corresponding rates in unvaccinated children of the same age in the pre-vaccine era.