powder

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powder

 [pow´der]
an aggregation of particles, as that obtained by grinding or rubbing a solid.

pow·der

(pow'dĕr),
1. A dry mass of minute separate particles of any substance.
2. In pharmaceutics, a homogeneous dispersion of finely divided, relatively dry, particulate matter consisting of one or more substances; the degree of fineness of a pow'der is related to passage of the material through standard sieves.
3. A single dose of a powdered drug, enclosed in an envelope of folded paper.
4. To reduce a solid substance to a state of fine division.
[Fr. poudre; L. pulvis]

powder

(pou′dər)
n.
1. A substance consisting of ground, pulverized, or otherwise finely dispersed solid particles.
2. Any of various preparations in the form of powder, as certain cosmetics and medicines.

pow′der·er n.

powder

the dried product of an extraction process in which a substance is first mixed with a solvent such as alcohol or water. Then, the solvent is removed completely. The dry solid that remains either is already in powder form or may be ground into it.

powder

Chinese medicine
A general term for ground herbs and formulas used in Chinese herbal medicine to prepare in capsules, infusions, liquors, porridges, ointments, pastes and pills; powders are less concentrated than decoctions, gentler, are best suited for chronic conditions.

powder

Drug slang A pulverized abuse substance–eg, heroin, amphetamine, cocaine Vox populi A pulverized material. See Antler velvet powder, Dover's powder, Fluticasone propionate inhalation powder, Inheritance powder, James Fever powder, Talcum powder.

pow·der

(pow'dĕr)
1. A dry mass of minute separate particles of any substance.
2. pharmaceutics A homogeneous dispersion of finely divided, relatively dry particulate matter consisting of one or more substances.
3. A single dose of a powdered drug, enclosed in an envelope of folded paper.
4. To reduce a solid substance to a state of very fine division.
[Fr. poudre; L. pulvis]

powder,

n in homeopathy, a dosage form, often lactose, that has had a small amount of homeopathic remedy poured on it. This powder can then be consumed by the patient.

pow·der

(pow'dĕr)
1. A dry mass of minute separate particles of any substance.
2. In pharmaceutics, a homogeneous dispersion of finely divided, relatively dry, particulate matter consisting of one or more substances.
[Fr. poudre; L. pulvis]

powder

an aggregation of particles obtained by grinding or triturating a solid.

dusting powder
a fine powder used as a talc substitute.
glove powder
sterile and special grind for powdering surgical gloves.
References in classic literature ?
Perfectly correct," said Morgan; "but before deciding the quantity of powder necessary to give the impulse, I think it would be as well "
We shall have to employ a large-grained powder," continued the major; "its combustion is more rapid than that of the small.
We shall run no danger of an explosion; and it is necessary that our powder should take fire instantaneously in order that its mechanical effect may be complete.
And then my lamps fall on another party present, who, I says to myself, is failin' in a proper affection toward his comin' son-in- law, so I watches my chance and dumps that powder in old man Riddle's coffee--see?
A while ago the crooked Sorcerer who invented the Magic Powder fell down a precipice and was killed.
Well," continued the Tin Woodman, "the old woman had an idea that the Powder in the bottle must be moth-powder, because it smelled something like moth-powder; so one day she sprinkled it on her bear rug to keep the moths out of it.
Therefore I believe it is a good thing that all the Magic Powder of Life is now used up, as it can not cause any more trouble.
No servant will come here because the place is so lonely and out-of-the-way, so my clever husband, the Crooked Magician, proposed that I make a girl out of some sort of material and he would make her live by sprinkling over her the Powder of Life.
We're a-changing of the powder, Jack," answers one.
I came into Oxford Street by the Marble Arch, and here again were black powder and several bodies, and an evil, ominous smell from the gratings of the cellars of some of the houses.
As for Porthos, after having hurled the barrel of powder amidst his enemies, he had fled, as Aramis had directed him to do, and had gained the last compartment, into which air, light, and sunshine penetrated through the opening.
This was game indeed to us, but this was no food; and I was very sorry to lose three charges of powder and shot upon a creature that was good for nothing to us.