poverty


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Related to poverty: Absolute poverty

pov·er·ty

peniaphobia.

poverty

[pov′ərtē]
Etymology: L, paupertas
1 a lack of material wealth needed to maintain existence.
2 a loss of emotional capacity to feel love or sympathy.

poverty

The state of being deprived of the essentials of well-being, such as adequate housing, food, sufficient income, employment, access to required social services and social status. The most commonly used threshold of low income in the UK is a household income that is ≤ 60% of the average (median) British household income. In 2008/9, poverty was defined in terms of the amount of money left after income tax, council tax and housing costs (rent, mortgage interest, buildings insurance and water charges) have been deducted: £119 per week for single adult with no dependent children and £288 per week for a couple with two dependent children under 14. These sums of money represent what the household has left to spend on food, heating, travel, entertainment, and any needs or wants. In 2008/09, 13 million people in the UK were living in households below this low-income threshold—i.e., 22% of the population—compared 12 million at that level in 2004/05.

poverty

(pov′ĕrt-ē) [Fr. poverté, fr L. paupertas]
The condition of having an inadequate supply of money, resources, or means of subsistence. In 2010 in the U.S., for example, a family of four earning less than $22,000 was considered to live in poverty.

poverty of thought

The mental state of being devoid of thought and having a feeling of emptiness.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tables provide statistics on the number of people in poverty, the number of children younger than age 5 in poverty (for states only), the number of children ages 5 to 17 in families in poverty, the number younger than age 18 in poverty, and median household income.
The government eyes to break the cycle of poverty by ensuring that pregnant women undergo regular checkups and children from poor families go to school.
I see effects of poverty in shorter life expectancy and more disabling diseases among the poor.
In a statement to MPs, Mr Duncan Smith said he was scrapping the offi-cial measures and targets used in the 2010 Act, which defines a child as being in poverty if it is in a household with less than 60% of the national median average income.
BahceE-ehir University's Center for Economic and Social Research (BETAM) last Friday published a research brief titled "Dynamics of Poverty in Turkey.
Entrenched poverty and prejudice, and vast gulfs between wealth and destitution, can undermine the fabric of societies and lead to instability," Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said in his message for the Day, which is commemorated annually on 17 October.
Living in poverty" and "living in a poverty area" aren't the same thing.
Poverty measurement is a complex undertaking that involves analyzing demographic and socioeconomic characteristics within a spatial environment.
An open letter from Communities and Tackling Poverty Minister Jeff Cuthbert and Vaughan Gething, the Deputy Minister for Tackling Poverty, accuses UK Ministers of failing to recognise the impact of its own tax and benefit changes on child poverty.
because we expanded pro-work and pro-family programs like the Earned Income Tax Credit, a recent study found that the poverty rate has fallen by nearly 40% since the 1960s, and kept millions from falling into poverty during the Great Recession.
The failure of the trickledown theory to reduce poverty is now well acknowledged in the development circle.