poultry

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poultry

(pōl′trē)
n.
Domesticated fowl, such as chickens, turkeys, ducks, or geese, raised for meat or eggs.

poultry

farmed, domestic birds including fowls, turkeys, ducks, geese. For other words relating to domestic birds, see under avian.

poultry flea
see echidnophagagallinacea.
poultry hemorrhagic syndrome
see hemorrhagic syndrome.
poultry mite
poultry waste
spilled feed, dried litter and fecal residues from chicken houses can be used to provide a high-protein supplement feed for livestock. There are hazards, especially botulism and poisoning by feed additives such as copper and phosphorus. The material may also contain an unidentified hepatoxin. Called also dried poultry waste.
References in periodicals archive ?
1951: Hundreds of families were emjoying cheap New Year turkeys after Merseyside poulterers miscalculated demand for the holiday season.
The results of her research cover what animals were considered to be edible; how they were slaughtered; what tools were used to do this; how the carcasses were stored; the status of butchers, poulterers and fishermen; and the methods of jointing and processing, including drying, smoking, and steeping in brine and other substances.
But Bickel Ltd, fishmongers and poulterers are no more.
The Lecture was intiated by the seven City Livery Companies involved with the food industry, the Fruiterers, Butchers, Poulterers, Fishmongers, Bakers, Cooks and Farmers, who, at their cost, provide the remarkable and historic facility of the Guildhall for the occasion, held in January.
Pigeon is available in specialist poulterers and fishmongers.
Mr J Webb, president of the National Federation of Fishmongers and Poulterers, said to a "Birmingham Post" reporter, "We have been told by the Government that we must give the scheme a three months run, and then, if we are in a position to prove that the margin of profit is not sufficient to enable retailers to carry on their business, the matter will be considered.
At the time of the Black Death in 1349, local authorities were encouraged to intervene particularly energetically in price regulation by legislation that required them to impose "reasonable" prices on butchers, fishmongers, innkeepers, brewers, bakers, poulterers, and other food-sellers, and this law was subsequently restated and elaborated.