potent

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po·tent

(pō'tĕnt),
1. Possessing force, power, strength.
See also: totipotent, pluripotent, unipotent.
2. Indicating the ability of a primordial cell to differentiate.
See also: totipotent, pluripotent, unipotent.
3. In psychiatry, possessing sexual potency.

potent

(pōt′nt)
adj.
1. Exerting or capable of exerting strong physiological or chemical effects.
2. Able to achieve and maintain an erection that allows for sexual intercourse. Used of a male.

potent

[pō′tənt]
Etymology: L, potentia, power
powerful or strong.

po·tent

(pō'tĕnt)
1. Possessing force, power, strength.
2. Indicating the ability of a primordial cell to differentiate.
3. Possessing sexual potency.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the preliminary experiment, the n-BuOH fraction of CL Me0H extract potently inhibited AChE activity in vitro and reversed scopolamine-induced memory deficits in mice.
The unique combination of small size and very high affinity allows this new class of drugs candidates to potently and specifically inhibit RNA targets in many different tissues without the need for complex delivery vehicles.
In the "Narratives" program, the possibilities of dance and film fuse most potently.
For example, the holly was a holy tree to the ancients, considered potently protective.
This extension combines potently with the increasingly sophisticated formulations of these counterexamples.
Following high throughput screening of chemical libraries, several families of compounds have been identified that selectively and potently inhibit the activity of the LPAAT-B enzyme and stop cancer cell growth in animal cancer models.
We beat Leicester at McDiarmid Park last time but what we will be seeking is much more consistency and the ability to compete more potently away from home.
No American poet has written more potently of the thick-plated hell of the closet (read his "Calamus 40" or "Song of the Open Road"), and the closet is what the military policy perpetuates.
Therefore, my feeling that Branch, in his introduction, could've been more aggressive in making a case for the potently distinctive nature of the African and African descent voices in world theatre as an entity wholly unto itself, and not just a curious (or perhaps exotic) phenomenon illustrating black progress against a backdrop of European tradition, might simply be a sign of the times in which we live.
Unlike so many recent New Historicist studies depicting English explorers in this period as potently rapacious, Knapp's book reminds us that the English were slow to colonize the New World, and that their early imperial attempts ended mostly in failure.
Ponatinib potently inhibited the activity of these kinases and maintained potent activity against gatekeeper variants that have been shown to cause resistance to other tyrosine kinase inhibitors in acute myeloid leukemia, medullary thyroid cancer, gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and rare forms of leukemia driven by these tyrosine kinases.