potable

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potable

 [po´tah-b'l]
fit to drink.

po·ta·ble

(pō'tă-bĕl),
Drinkable; fit to drink.
[L. potabilis, fr. poto, to drink]

potable

/pot·a·ble/ (po´tah-b'l) fit to drink.

potable

Clinical nutrition adjective Drinkable noun A drinkable fluid

po·ta·ble

(pō'tă-bĕl)
Drinkable; fit to drink.
[L. potabilis, fr. poto, to drink]

po·ta·ble

(pō'tă-bĕl)
Drinkable; fit to drink.
[L. potabilis, fr. poto, to drink]

potable

fit to drink.
References in periodicals archive ?
8226; Alternate considerations for assessing potability
Itah AY and CE Akpan Potability of Drinking Water in an Oil Impacted Community in Southern Nigeria.
This collection of research articles on the contamination, toxicity and treatment of drinking water is designed for researchers and field engineers, with expert contributors examining the disease vectors and pathogens that may cause public health crises if safety guidelines for potability are not met.
If the groundwater is also to be used for drinking water, potability parameters should be included.
At micro-level, the site and potability were confounders; outdoor non potable water storage containers posed significant breeding risk, the potable water storage was significant but it contributed little to Ae.
Nancy Siraisi's "Historiae, Natural History, Roman Antiquity, and Some Roman Physicians" shows how sixteenth-century learned physicians in Rome "integrated medicine with natural historical, historical, and antiquarian learning" in a polemic on public health: "a battle of the books over the potability of Tiber water" (325), thus connecting ancient authors, narratives of their own cases, and public utility (a purpose shared with civil history).
The wellfield protection zones in Florida, which typically have been established by county ordinance, draw a line around wellfields, inside which industry is banned, because of the potential impact on the potability of underground water.
The local mill recycles 100 per cent of roughly 15,000 US gallons of water per minute, and while it is not uncommon for Northern mines to treat water to potability standards, Inco has two comparatively large treatment plants that serve entire communities besides their industrial operations.
And whatever the source of the water, have it tested for potability
Furthermore, it is likely that the reduced hydrostatic pressure in those aquifers would favour a subsurface migration of saline ocean waters, destroying their potability.
Bick's work, the culmination of over four years of research, sought a low-cost, portable and publicly accessible method for testing water potability.
Moreover, the Kingdom is also working to improvise and develop desalination method of water for potability to fulfill drinking water requirements.