postsynaptic membrane

post·syn·ap·tic mem·brane

that part of the plasma membrane of a neuron or muscle fiber with which an axon terminal forms a synaptic junction; in many instances, at least part of such a small postsynaptic membrane patch shows characteristic morphologic modifications such as greater thickness and higher electron density, believed to correspond to the transmitter-sensitive receptor site of such synapses.

post·syn·ap·tic mem·brane

(pōst'si-nap'tik mem'brān)
That part of the plasma membrane of a neuron or muscle fiber with which an axon terminal forms a synaptic junction.

postsynaptic membrane

the excitable membrane of the DENDRITE next to the AXON at a synapse, that receives the nerve impulse.
References in periodicals archive ?
The most common of such conditions is myasthenia gravis (MG), an autoimmune disorder in which an antibody-mediated, T-cell-dependent process targets acetylcholine receptors on the postsynaptic membrane of the neuromuscular junction.
Subsequently, neurotransmitter is released into the synaptic cleft and diffuses to the postsynaptic membrane to activate neurotransmitter receptors.
2010) mention that SNAP-23is involved in postsynaptic membrane trafficking events and its alteration decreases expression of NMDA (non-natural aminoacid N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptors of glutamate surface and the amount of current receivers in dendritic spines from hippocampal neurons in culture.
This balance can be maintained by regulating the number of neurotransmitter receptors in the postsynaptic membrane.
Sufficient depolarization of the postsynaptic membrane reaches a threshold at which a second action potential is induced and the impulse is successfully transmitted to the next neuron.
Since weak depolarization of postsynaptic membrane and activation of postsynaptic [G.
Glutamate then activates NMDA receptors [~50 NMDA receptors dispersed over a 400-nm-diameter postsynaptic density (1) at postsynaptic membrane which further propagates excitatory impulse to cell body and also it activates calcium and calmodulin to bind with each other (2) and causes release of nitric oxide (NO) from nitric oxide synthetase (NOS) (One NOS molecule generates 20 NO molecules per second).
Additionally, LTP can be induced at lower frequencies if the postsynaptic membrane is experimentally depolarized (Kelso and Brown, 1986; Wigstrom and Gustafsson, 1986; Meredith et al.
The depolarizing agents bind to acetylcholine receptors and cause a sustained postsynaptic membrane depolarization.
synaptic development), the ability to detect and integrate signals that occur simultaneously at the presynaptic terminal and postsynaptic membrane (i.
Following nerve impulse transmission, acetylcholine is released from the postsynaptic membrane receptor and is broken down by acetylcholinesterase (AChE) to choline and acetic acid.
Research about the pathophysiology of MG reveals this immune dysfunction occurs in 3 ways, which primarily alter depolarization of muscle tissue at the postsynaptic membrane.