postsynaptic


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postsynaptic

 [pōst″sĭ-nap´tik]
distal to or occurring beyond a synapse.

post·syn·ap·tic

(pōst'sin-ap'tik),
Pertaining to the area on the distal side of a synaptic cleft.

postsynaptic

/post·sy·nap·tic/ (-sĭ-nap´tik) distal to or occurring beyond a synapse.

postsynaptic

(pōst′sĭ-năp′tĭk)
adj.
Situated behind or occurring after a synapse: postsynaptic neurons.

post′syn·ap′ti·cal·ly adv.

postsynaptic

[-sinap′tik]
Etymology: L, post + Gk, synaptein, to join
1 situated after a synapse.
2 occurring after a synapse has been crossed.

postsynaptic

distal to the synapse

postsynaptic

distal to or occurring beyond a synapse.

postsynaptic potentiation
increased rate of discharge of a nerve cell that has been subjected to intensive stimulation. Appears to be related to the appearance of a greater number of dendritic spines.
References in periodicals archive ?
5) Therefore, studies examining CNS synapse formation were mainly conducted in a few specific types of synapses, namely, those in which presynaptic and postsynaptic components are well-defined and both divergence and convergence of axonal projections are low, such as climbing fiber synapses on cerebellar Purkinje cells.
It must be noted that the r esponses of the GE and GI neurons can be biphasic, because of the existence of presynaptic inputs and postsynaptic conditions.
Subsequently, neurotransmitter is released into the synaptic cleft and diffuses to the postsynaptic membrane to activate neurotransmitter receptors.
Twenty chapters are divided into four parts: neurons: excitable and secretory cells that establish synapses; ionotropic and metabotropic receptors in synaptic transmission; somato-dendritic processing and plasticity of postsynaptic potentials; the hippocampal network.
For the sake of simplicity, the design has omitted both the axon and axon-terminals as subelements, as the design allows the cell body of the presynaptic neuron directly assigns a stimulus to the dendrites of postsynaptic neurons.
The neurotransmitter binds to specific receptors in the postsynaptic terminal, thereby acting as a "switch" for the postsynaptic cell.
The released neurotransmitter binds to postsynaptic receptors, leading to a response in the postsynaptic neuron.
They have been found on both pre-and postsynaptic cells, and are expressed in epithelium, connective and muscle tissues.
Ammonia per se decreases postsynaptic inhibition of cortical, spinal and trochlear motor neurons leading to severe tonic convulsions (Haliburton and Morgan, 1989).