postnasal drip syndrome

postnasal drip syndrome

,

PNDS

An important cause of chronic cough, often associated with chronic or allergic rhinitis, in which nasal secretions drain via the posterior pharynx.
References in periodicals archive ?
In preschool children, think upper or lower respiratory tract infection, rhinitis, postnasal drip syndrome, gastroesophageal reflux, an irritant source (such as passive smoking or air pollution), and, of course, asthma.
Patients reporting symptoms suggestive of postnasal drip syndrome or GORD may first be offered a trial of empiric treatment.
Patients in the successful and partial responder categories received a presumptive diagnosis of postnasal drip syndrome, and we asked them to continue using the medication for at least 2 weeks.
The successful-responder category included 176 patients (47%); 79 (21%) were classed as partial responders, and 255 (67%) received the presumptive diagnosis of postnasal drip syndrome.
Within 5 days of beginning the course determined by the algorithm (FIGURE), 176 patients (47%) who received treatment for presumed postnasal drip syndrome experienced resolution of their chronic cough.
It is believed to be due to several different mechanisms: irritation from GERD, postnasal drip syndrome, in-halation of irritants, or psychiatric conditions such as obsessive-compulsive disorder and depression leading to a conversion reaction.
The other causes include smoking; allergic reactions; and postnasal drip syndrome.
It is believed to be due to several different mechanisms: irritation from GERD, postnasal drip syndrome, inhalation of irritants, or psychiatric conditions that lead to a conversion reaction.
Work-up for persisting cough should consider congenital anomalies and then be directed toward common causes of chronic cough like those seen in older children and adults, including postnasal drip syndrome, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and asthma (SOR: C).
A cough associated with throat clearing suggests GERD or postnasal drip syndrome.
Evaluation and treatment for postnasal drip syndrome (PNDS), asthma, and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) should remedy symptoms in the vast majority of patients (grade of recommendation: C, based on case series at referral centers).
Treat empirically for postnasal drip syndrome (PNDS) for 1 to 2 weeks with a first-generation antihistamine-decongestant combination.