postmortem histology

postmortem histology

A term of art referring to the assessment by light microscopy of tissue from a deceased, which is allowed under Rule 9 of the UK Coroner’s Rules 2005, if the pathologist examining the body believes tissue microscopy bears upon the cause of death.

Post mortem histology should be taken 
• To confirm macroscopic diagnosis, especially pneumonia, which is difficult to diagnose grossly;
• From a morphologically normal heart, in a suspected “sudden cardiac death”;
• In a “negative autopsy”, tissue from all of the major organs should be retained in order to exclude significant microscopic pathology;
• To assist in “dating” lesions of significance—e.g. pulmonary thromboemboli, other thrombi, injuries (cutaneous and visceral);
• To assist in classifying “naked eye” lesions—e.g. fatty liver; or
• In “protocol-driven” autopsies (e.g., SIDS/SUDI, epilepsy etc.) to ensure uniformity.
References in periodicals archive ?
The committee is to investigate allegations that the doctor failed to take adequate steps to act upon information imparted to him as medical director of Alder Hey regarding the delays in the provision of postmortem histology and a backlog in the delivery of final post mortem reports.