posterior


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Related to posterior: Posterior distribution, Posterior urethral valves

posterior

 [pos-tēr´e-or]
directed toward or situated at the back; opposite of anterior. Called also dorsal.

pos·ter·i·or

(pos-tēr'ē-ŏr),
1. human anatomy denoting the back surface of the body. Often used to indicate the position of one structure relative to another, that is, nearer the back of the body. Synonym(s): dorsalis [TA], dorsal (2) , posticus
2. After, in relation to time or space.
3. veterinary anatomy limited to structures of the eye and ear. The word is otherwise ambiguous with respect to the anatomy of quadrupeds; caudal is preferred.
[L. comparative of posterus, following]

posterior

/pos·ter·i·or/ (pos-tēr´e-er) directed toward or situated at the back; opposite of anterior.

posterior

(pŏ-stîr′ē-ər, pō-)
adj.
1. Located behind a part or toward the rear of a structure.
2. Relating to the caudal end of the body in quadrupeds or the back of the body in humans and other primates.
3. Botany Next to or facing the main stem or axis.
4. Coming after in order; following.
5. Following in time; subsequent.
n.
The buttocks.

pos·te′ri·or·ly adv.

posterior

[postir′ē·ər]
Etymology: L, behind
1 adj, in the back part of a structure, such as the dorsal surface of the human body.
2 n, the back part of something.
3 adj, toward the back. Compare anterior.

posterior

Sexology
noun A euphemism for the buttocks.

pos·ter·i·or

(pos-tēr'ē-ŏr)
1. After, in relation to time or space.
2. human anatomy Denoting the back surface of the body. Often used to indicate the position of one structure relative to another, i.e., nearer the back of the body.
Synonym(s): dorsal (2) .
3. Near the tail or caudal end of certain embryos.
4. A substitute for caudal in quadrupeds; in veterinary anatomy, posterior is used only to denote some structures of the head.
[L. comparative of posterus, following]

posterior

Pertaining to the back of the body or a part. Dorsal. Compare ANTERIOR.

posterior

relating to the back surface/area

pos·ter·i·or

(pos-tēr'ē-ŏr)
1. After, in relation to time or space.
2. human anatomy denoting the back surface of the body. Often used to indicate the position of one structure relative to another, i.e., nearer the back of the body.
Synonym(s): dorsal (2) .
[L. comparative of posterus, following]

posterior (postē´rēər),

adj situated behind.
posterior nasal spine,
posterior palatal bar,
n See connector, major, posterior palatal.
posterior palatal seal,
posterior palatal seal area,

posterior

directed toward or situated at the back; opposite of anterior. In quadrupeds usually applied only to parts of the head.

posterior-anterior
with the x-ray beam passing from the back to the front, especially to the limbs.
posterior chamber luxation
see lens luxation.
posterior (caudal) drawer sign
instability of the stifle joint with caudal movement of the proximal tibia in relation to the distal femur; normally restricted by the intact posterior (caudal) cruciate ligament. This movement is used as a test in the diagnosis of rupture of the ligament in the dog.
posterior functional stenosis
failure of pyloric outflow from the abomasum, as part of the syndrome of vagus indigestion in cattle.
inherited posterior paralysis
congenital paraplegia recorded in cattle and pigs. There are other nervous signs, e.g. opisthotonos, in some forms.
posterior limiting membrane
posterior pituitary
posterior polar cataract
posterior segment
the vitreous body, retina, choroid and optic disk.
posterior station trypanosomes
one of the two types of cyclical development of trypanosomes. In this form the metacyclic trypomastigotes accumulate in the hindgut of the arthropod vector and are passed out with its feces. Infection of the definitive vertebrate host occurs via the skin or skin wound. Called also stercoracic.
posterior vena caval thrombosis
see caudal vena caval thrombosis.

Patient discussion about posterior

Q. Is there any reason behind this? a bipolar woman is mostly misdiagnosed for depression…..is there any reason behind this?

A. freebrid12 is right, and there's another thing- depression is a very common diagnosis amongst women and bipolar is less common. therefore psychiatrist tend to diagnose depression more then bipolar disorder.

Q. I have been having chronic pain in sinus area and behind my eyes, been to ENT who states it is not infection? I wake up with the pain and go to sleep in severe pain. Its all day and all night. Dr insists that its migraine related and allergy related. I have chronic postnasal drainage. It started 4 months ago when I moved into our new house. The pain makes me extremely fatigue and dizzy at times. I have been referred to the eye doctor, a headache specialist and an allergy specialist. Just recently I have had a CT scan and an MRI, as well as xrays of my sinus. Nothing other than a deviated septum and possible allergies from an ENT has been diagnosed. In the mean time I am waiting for the days to come when I can get into see these specialist. Anyone out there have any of the same symptoms?? Need help here. Soooooo sick of the pain.

A. i have chronic sinusitis and can really relate to what you describe. learned to live with the pain...but still, i use various ways to reduce inflammation in my sinuses, i heat the place up before going to sleep, try to avoid eating or drinking cold stuff.
another thing i do is i heat water (80c) then add a special oil i bought in a chinese medicine store , about 5 drops, and inhale the fumes. nettle tea can do wonders too.

Q. info on arachnoid cyst in the right posterior fossa

A. Basically it's like a small sac filled with fluid. The problem is that the skull is a rigid closed space, which means that if there's something other than the brain, it'll occupy space, usually on expense of the brains' space. These kinds of problems are often referred to as "space occupying lesion".

It's usually congenital (i.e. develops during pregnancy), and even when it cause symptoms they develop slowly.

YOu can read more here (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arachnoid_cyst)

More discussions about posterior
References in periodicals archive ?
Retisert, an implant for posterior uveitis, is licensed to and sold by Bausch & Lomb.
Baseplate fixation in the 10[degrees] and 20[degrees] posterior glenoid defect scapulae were assessed using both standard rTSA glenoid baseplates with eccentric reaming (N = 7 for each size defect) and using 8[degrees] posterior augment glenoid baseplates with off-axis reaming (N = 7 for each size defect) (Fig.
Brain MRI findings in posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome are specific for the disease.
The literature describes 18 cases of posterior dislocation with combined femoral neck, femoral head or acetabular fracture.
Mapping After Epicardial Ablation of the Posterior Left Atrium," by Murali Chiravuri, MD, PhD, of Bridgeport Hospital Yale New Haven Health, Bridgeport, CT, and Danbury Hospital, Danbury, CT.
The diagnosis of posterior urethral valves can and should be made antenatally.
This suggested to us that the crucial predictor of individual differences in recollection ability might not be the overall size of the hippocampus but the separate contributions of the posterior and anterior segments of the hippocampus," he said.
Computed tomography (CT) and MRI characteristically reveal symmetrically distributed areas of vasogenic edema predominantly located within the territories of the posterior circulation of the brain (3).
This repeated compression and entrapment, like nuts in a nutcracker, results in bone contusions and local synovitis involving the posterior recess of the tibiotalar and subtalar joints.
It also refers to the ability to use this one device to perform all three functions of taking anterior periapical, posterior periapical and bitewing radiographs.
AthleticFX, a leading sport development training organization based in Rochester, New York, today announced that based on its evaluation of hundreds of young athletes it had identified posterior chain development as the most overlooked aspect of youth athletic training in metro Rochester, New York.
In an interesting article published in this edition of SAJOG, Adam and co-workers (1) look at the differences between gynaecologists and urologists with regard to management of the posterior pelvic compartment.