postconcussive syndrome

A constellation of symptoms that follow traumatic brain injury, which is more common in athletes

postconcussive syndrome

Sports medicine A constellation of Sx that follow traumatic brain injury, more common in athletes Clinical Altered consciousness, anxiety, dizziness, limited post-traumatic amnesia, ability to concentrate, fatigability, headaches, sleep disturbances, disturbed vision, equilibrium, and other Sx, and an initial Glasgow Coma Scale of ≥ 13 of 15. See Concussion.
References in periodicals archive ?
In summary, it is notable that there are a host of issues at work in TBI, such as postconcussive syndrome, posttraumatic headaches, and ineffective communication between primary care providers and specialists.
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and the subsequent experience of postconcussive syndrome have been referred to as signature injuries among combat veterans involved in Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF).
g, post-stroke depression, frontotemporal dementia, and postconcussive syndrome after mild traumatic brain injury, that illustrate their human impact and the science informing treatment.
Such an injury poses a risk for short-term symptoms including headache and difficulty with balance, thinking, concentrating, and sleeping, and may lead to long-term symptoms categorized as postconcussive syndrome, according to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.
are informed about a postconcussive syndrome and persistent problems emerging from mild traumatic brain injury, a new syndrome could arise from the current conflict in which soldiers attribute a range of common stress reactions to the effects of brain injury.
Patients with the postconcussive syndrome may show both cognitive and behavioral-emotional disorders.
A normal study does not exclude the diagnosis of postconcussive syndrome.
Persisting symptoms after mild head injury: A review of the postconcussive syndrome.
posttraumatic stress disorder or pain) that likely complicated both the clinical presentation and subsequent treatment [3-4], a finding that has been labeled Postdeployment Syndrome [5] and may help explain the higher rate of persistent postconcussive syndrome (PPCS) in military personnel than civilian individuals [3].
Since the symptoms of postconcussive syndrome are ego dystonic, she said, the patient might try to adapt to this new, negative vision of himself, thinking that he is fundamentally changed forever.
Published data on balance deficits is lacking within the late postconcussive syndrome population.
Neuropsychiatric correlates of persistent postconcussive syndrome.