reconstruction

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reconstruction

 [re″kon-struk´shun]
1. the reassembling or re-forming of something from constituent parts.
2. surgical restoration of function of a body part, such as with a bypass or plastic surgery.
aortic reconstruction restoration of function to a damaged aorta, as by bypass or aortoplasty.

re·con·struc·tion

(rē'kŏn-strŭk'shŭn),
The computerized synthesis of one or more two-dimensional images from a series of x-ray projections in computed tomography, or from a large number of measurements in magnetic resonance imaging; several methods are used; the earliest was back-projection, and the most common is two-dimensional Fourier transformation.

reconstruction

/re·con·struc·tion/ (-kon-struk´shun)
1. the reassembling or re-forming of something from constituent parts.
2. surgical restoration of function of a body part.

reconstruction

An eClinical trial term of art for archival trial records that should support the data as well as the processes used for obtaining and managing the data, such that the trustworthiness of results obtained can be evaluated. Reconstruction from records should confirm the validity of the information system and its conformance to applicable regulations during design and execution of the trial, as well as during the period of record retention.

re·con·struc·tion

(rē'kŏn-strŭk'shŭn)
The computed synthesis of one or more two-dimensional images from a series of x-ray projections in tomography, or from a large number of measurements in magnetic resonance imaging; several methods are used; the earliest was back-projection, and the most common is 2-D Fourier transformation.

reconstruction

to reassemble or re-form from constituent parts, such as the mathematical process by which an image is assembled from a series of projections in computed tomography.
References in periodicals archive ?
The continued promise of freedom, an aspiration for postbellum America, comes not from a centralized federal government--which Lanier, as a southerner, would always find suspect-but from those cultural forms, manifest in poetic structure, that have been carried down through generations of English men and women.
The southern growth in depth and breadth of patenting is demonstrated first, while the second part of the essay will outline the evolution of the postbellum patent system described by Naomi Lamoreaux, Ken Sokoloff, and Margaret Levenstein.
Cumbler's analysis of aging abolitionists' inability to create a postbellum analog to their grand pre-Civil War movement also illuminates the transitory nature of social reform.
In McLennan's view, the brutalities of the southern convict lease system, in which employers had complete control of convicts, was merely "the extreme limit of a national norm" in the postbellum era.
It is a place that brings hope and sustains despair--a place rooted with a plantation legacy and left reeling with postbellum socioeconomic challenges.
Sadly, this mythology captured the religious imagination of many evangelicals in postbellum America.
In the postbellum era in the United States, and simultaneously in Britain, the swift growth of large-scale capitalism led to the need for a "modernized" version of AF.
Likewise, some of Rivoli's claims about the lack competition and hopelessness facing sharecroppers in the postbellum South are overwrought, as much recent research by economic historians shows.
The enhanced civility and socialization of Germans within the Europaen context which Harsdorffer promoted in his multi-volume work suggest a new configuration of Self and Other in the waning years after the Thirty Years' War and provide models for social interaction in the postbellum period" (29).
Like a handful of others--Christopher Hitchens, Charles Krauthammer, and the late Oriana Fallaci--he has never indulged in the usual litany of postbellum faultfinding: "Secretary of Defense Rumsfeld must resign"; "we must go into Iran or Syria or else I give up on the President"; "you put too few troops in Iraq to have allowed my brilliant ideas of reconstruction to work.
Black men in the postbellum era were the same as white men, but with a difference--they were (un)desirable, uncanny, a threat.