postanginal

postanginal

(pōst-an-jī'năl),
Following a purulent pharyngitis or peritonsillar abscess.
References in periodicals archive ?
1 Lemierre's syndrome also called postanginal septicaemia and "the forgotten disease" as many physicians are unaware of the disease is thought to be caused by the gram negative bacteria - Fusodobacterium Necrophorum (FN).
Lemierre's syndrome or postanginal septicaemia is characterized by septic internal jugular and deep neck veins thrombosis preceded by a history of pharyngitis or tonsillitis.
This syndrome is also known as postanginal septicemia or necrobacillosis (Alherabi, 2009), and the number of published cases has increased recently, with six appearing between 1980 and 1990, 50 more from 1991 to 2000, and then climbing to 121 from 2001 to 2008.
Lemierre's syndrome (necrobacillosis or postanginal septicaemia) was first reported in 1900 by Gourmont and Cade (1) and later described by Andre Lemierre in 1936 in a review of 20 cases.
Lemierre syndrome or postanginal sepsis (necrobacillosis) is characterized by septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein (IJV) with frequent metastatic infections, usually due to anaerobic organisms.
However, it has rarely been reported in the context of postanginal sepsis.
Lemierre syndrome (also known as postanginal sepsis).
This patient's clinical picture is consistent with postanginal sepsis, a severe and rare complication of pharyngitis.
Sinnott JT, Wheedon BA, Schwartz M, Villanueva L: Postanginal
The most common manifestations of necrobacillosis include postanginal sepsis, bone and joint infections, and abdominal and genital tract infections.
Metastatic complications of Fusobacterium necrophorum sepsis: two cases of Lemierre's postanginal septicemia.
Subsequent reports of this syndrome-which is also known as postanginal septicemia and a form of necrobacillosis-appeared intermittently in the literature until the 1950s.