positivism

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Related to positivists: Logical positivists

positivism

A school of philosophy that rejects value judgements, metaphysics and theology and holds that the only path to reliable knowledge is that of scientific observation and experiment.

positivism,

n the notion that all desired information can be obtained through data that are physically measurable.
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At first blush, Firmin's interpretation of Darwin seems misguided--an almost willful misreading occasioned by Firmin's own positivist ideology.
First, philosophically, the mainstream positivists are unable to explain the nature of a 'concept' independent of normative engagement.
Positivists are divided, however, on whether validation criteria can have a moral component.
45) But the positivists rejected such "metaphysical" conceptions as free will and its implicit contingencies; the criminal is qualitatively different, "a being apart" whose (essentially determined) behavior is therefore more amenable to positive analysis.
One reason is that, like Raz and other positivists, I hold that the
This is indeed how many legal positivists reacted to Dworkin's work, and I believe much of the disagreement with, even incomprehension of, Dworkin's views stems from failure to understand in what sense the question "what is law?
Because of their different pre-concept commitments, positivists and policy-oriented jurists have undertaken different intellectual tasks concerning different systems under their respective inquiries.
Indeed, the logical positivists developed a principle of tolerance, according to which statements were not automatically rejected if they were not of a particular form or did not use a particular vocabulary.
In upholding the uses of positivist public administration, Meier (2005) championed the importance of rigorous methodologies because policy makers might read and act on his research.
Put plainly, I will explore the important challenges put forth by aretaic theory and defend the sort of positivist legal claims that Fletcher forwards.
Yet, interpretivists must also engage with the positivists if their cause is to be incorporated into HRM practice.