positivism

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positivism

A school of philosophy that rejects value judgements, metaphysics and theology and holds that the only path to reliable knowledge is that of scientific observation and experiment.

positivism,

n the notion that all desired information can be obtained through data that are physically measurable.
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Facts (without their subjective conditions) and rationality are the two beacons of objectivity in the positivistic view.
Positivistic and nonpositivistic researchers have vested interests in their paradigms and different incommensurate underlying philosophies of science.
seem obsessed, even oppressed by the enormous weight of paleographical and graphological apparatus left over from that great positivistic enterprise.
But, if science also does not wish to be positivistic (all sciences, except philosophy, are positivistic) then it should have a rational basis and beginning.
The present generation now supplements this formalist method with exhaustive analysis and interpretation of the historical record, thus returning to Santayana's more positivistic approach, if not his conclusions.
Instead, it isolates ethics in its attempt to base curriculum and teaching on modern, positivistic studies, not moral philosophy (Null 2007a).
The use of obsession as a weap-on against the positivistic nineteenth century again comes to the fore in Baudelaire's prose poem, which van Zuylen reads via Kant and Hegel's differing notions of madness.
One may also regret that he does not consider whether the 'scientific' methods, while not providing a total account of a work of literature, might form a basis for critical thought, as Larizza himself notes that Lanson used positivistic history as a basis for perceptive judgement.
Dolinin is primarily interested in discussing, fine-tuning, or modifying the positivistic findings of others.
In positivistic research, the underlying philosophy is rational in natural.
His goal is to examine their metafictional aspects as a preview of the writings of Maria de Zayas, and also to counter the omission of these idealistic tales from the canon, an omission which the author explains as a result of their being considered "less interesting, qualitatively inferior, or too far removed from positivistic definitions of literary reality" (12).
While the treatises follow a positivistic epistemology, Ganeri contends that De Roberto's real aim is to subvert the romantic concept of love popularized by Stendhal in La Chartreuse de Parme and De L'Amour.